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he term ‘Malthusian Trap’ refers to the disjunct between a population and its resources. The phenomenon, theorised by Thomas Malthus in the 1790s, is one in which a population increase is disproportionate to the supplies available, usually as a result of some kind of catastrophe such as war or famine.


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hoteliers


It’s no secret that the UK’s hospitality industry is experiencing recruitment issues. In fact, job vacancies are at their highest levels since records began, with industry bodies estimating that around one in five workers have left the sector during the coronavirus pandemic. With Brexit also driving worker shortages and further research suggesting that job vacancies in the industry were at high levels before the UK went into its first lockdown, Covid-19 cannot be solely to blame for a dearth of key workers within the sector. Mae Losasso speaks to Sophie Kilic, SVP for human resources at Accor Northern Europe, about the short and long-term solutions for the industry’s staffing crisis.


In recent years, theorists have feared a new variant of the Malthusian Trap, one in which, as Malthus himself wrote, “the number of labourers” is “above the proportion of the work in the market” – only, unlike Malthus, contemporary thinkers fear a widening of the gap as the result of an increasingly automated workforce.


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Hotel Management International / www.hmi-online.com


Sudtawee Thepsuponkul/Shutterstock.com


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