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BELMONT VILLAGE ALBANY Albany, California


Provider: Belmont Village Senior Living Architect: HKIT Architects


Context informs the design of Belmont Vil- lage Albany, a senior living community near the campus of UC Berkeley. The 175-resi- dence project draws its inspiration from the university, the local community, and the exceptional surrounding natural environ- ment. “We wanted to capture the feeling of the Berkeley community,” said Patricia Will, founder and chief executive officer of Belmont Village Senior Living. The project was conceived and designed


in affiliation with the university as a retire- ment community for faculty and staff, as well as the residents of the adjoining cities of Berkeley and Albany. The community is the product of a broad collaboration with university, city, civic, and advocacy groups over a period of six years.


8 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE / ISSUE 6 2017


Situated on land owned by the university about three miles from campus, the building connects to the neighborhood with views of the area including an adjacent creek, a Lit- tle League baseball park, a school, the hills to the east, and the San Francisco Bay and Golden Gate Bridge to the west. Oversized windows flood the building with natural light, and five terraces allow residents to enjoy the outdoors. The interior design takes its inspiration


from the natural environment. Each level of the building has its own color palette and artwork inspired by the elements: earth, wind, fire, and water. “It’s a very relaxing atmosphere,” said Will. Another goal was to create a project that was ecologically exceptional, said Will. Bel-


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