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BELMONT VILLAGE ALBANY


mont Village Albany is built to LEED Gold standards using environmentally-friendly materials and systems throughout. Sustain- able features include solar power capacity, the use of low-emitting materials, high ef- ficiency plumbing and light fixtures, and drought tolerant landscaping. Part of the design challenge was to fit the


building into a larger six-acre master planned development that includes retail and grocery while maintaining accessibility to the sur- rounding neighborhood. Civic engagement was part of the design process from the out- set. The Albany Strollers and Rollers, an area advocate for people-powered transportation, guided Belmont in the development of bi- cycle lanes that were incorporated into the design, along with walking and biking paths. “The connection to the academic, civic, and general community surrounding Alba- ny is impressive and a highly strategic ap- proach to the next phase of senior living,”


10 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE / ISSUE 6 2017


said Senior Living by Design judge Kelly Lindstrom, vice president of engagement and innovation, Vitality Senior Living. The design breaks from convention in


an important respect. Rather than separate residents by floors and wings, independent living, assisted living, and memory care are integrated under one roof. All community members, with the exception of those in secured memory care, share elevators, common areas, and dine together. The design helps encourage socialization and curbs ageism, and allows couples with dif-


fering care needs to live together. Emblematic of the overall design is a


monumental 22-foot burnished stainless steel sculpture situated at the exterior gateway to the property. “The community wanted a piece of extraordinary artwork,” said Will. The Belmont-commissioned piece, named Torqueri VIII, was created by renowned artist, and UC Berkeley grad, Bruce Beasley. He said: “The city had articulated a desire to have a sculpture that would act as a beacon and a sort of way-maker for the border be- tween Albany and Berkeley.”


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