search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
CONTEMPORARY DESIGNS TAKE SENIOR LIVING TO THE NEXT LEVEL


Scandinavian Design Merrill Gardens at Ballard


The design theme of Merrill Gardens at Ballard was heavily in- fluenced by the neighborhood’s Scandinavian roots. Located north of downtown Seattle, the area was originally settled by Norwegians who worked in the shipping and fishing industries. Ballard is home to the Nordic Heritage Museum, inspired by the values, traditions, art, and spirit of the Nordic peoples. The Scandinavian aesthetic is carried throughout the com-


munity. Amenity spaces include tall wood ceilings, generous windows, and modern furnishings to create a bright and airy interior feel.


Light-colored wood, common in Scandinavian design, is used throughout the interior. The lobby ceiling is made of light wood planks, and similar wood tones are used on the grand staircase in the lobby. The wood furniture in the common areas throughout the building is also light colored and has a modern Nordic design. Pops of subtle color in green and blue are used on the furniture.


Modern light fixtures continue the theme of clean, simple design. “Ballard has an excellent design and concept,” said Senior


Living by Design judge David Fik, principal and director of ar- chitecture at Lantz-Boggio Architects. He added that the Ballard project makes brilliant use of small spaces and exterior materi- als, and creates interesting interior and exterior spaces.


18 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE / ISSUE 6 2017


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68