search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
QUALITY IMPROVEMENT


Tech Trends Aim to Address Aging's Grand Challenges


By Sarah Lai Stirland


San Francisco, Calif. in November caught a glimpse of the future—and Senior Living Executive can report


S that it


like “Star Trek” than “Bladerunner.” That means that we’re not likely to have


humanoid butlers replacing senior living staff, but rather technologies that are going to be invisible and ambient. They will sur- round us and help us, but in an unobtrusive and easily accessible way—much like the ship’s voice-activated, faceless, ambient computer in “Star Trek.” This was one of the main takeaways from the conference, which focused on good de- sign and interaction, and how that design when combined with artificial intelligence (AI), automation, sensors, and other tech- nologies, can help us with the many chal- lenges that face us as we age. Another was how AI can improve the provision of care. More generally, the ideas and solutions discussed at the conference centered on how emerging technologies and better operations can help the senior living sec- tor address the eight “grand challenges” of aging, as identified by the founders


enior living executives who at- tended the Aging2.0 alliance’s 2017 OPTIMIZE conference in


looks more


of Aging2.0 through their work with the community. They include: Engagement and purpose; financial wellness; mobility and movement; enhancing daily living and lifestyles; improving the quality and efficiency of caregiving; care coordination; maintaining brain health; and improving the end-of-life experience. The exercise of creating categories of


challenges “essentially gives the answer to the ‘why' of: Why are we all doing this? Why is there this need for innovation in aging?” explained Stephen Johnston, Aging2.0’s co-founder in an interview. “There's mini examples of where it could be done better for quality of life for individuals, inefficiencies and challenges in care operations, managing our aging popu- lations, and the fact that it's just not working for a lot of people, and for the health care budgets,” he said. The entrepreneurs in this market face a


growing demand for their services: Globally, the number of people over the age of 60 is projected to grow by more than half to 1.4 billion people by 2030 from 2015, accord- ing to the United Nations. The number of people over 80 is expected to triple globally to 434 million in 2050, from 2015.


EIGHT 'GRAND CHALLENGES' OF AGING


Engagement and Purpose


1


Financial Wellness


2 3 4 5 6


Mobility and Movement


Enhancing Daily Living and Lifestyles


Improving the Quality and Efficiency of Caregiving


30 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE / ISSUE 6 2017 Care Coordination


Maintaining Brain Health


7


Improving the End-of-Life Experience


8


In addition to blending seamlessly into everyday life, AI should: solve important human problems, promote engagement, work for everyone every day, and grow with users’ needs and opportunities. Good design leads to technologies that learn and predict human behavior, bring useful products and services to the world without creating a dependency, and accelerates good ideas and trends.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68