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THE RIDGE Salt Lake City, Utah


Provider: Integral Senior Living Architect: ajc architects Interior Design: studioSIX5


The views take center stage at The Ridge, an assisted living and memory care commu- nity in Salt Lake City. The project overlooks the mountains and was designed to cater to older adults with a real appreciation for the outdoors. While the actual site is rather small, the design was able to maximize the spectacular views of Salt Lake City and the surrounding mesas. “The main feature is the landscape,” said


Shauna Revo, project design manager at studioSIX5. Large windows in the common areas and individual residences provide max- imum views of the nearby foothills. The interiors were inspired by the sur-


rounding mountain landscape and the ar- chitect’s building design which incorporated asymmetrical elements. Natural stone and


24 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE / ISSUE 6 2017


wood tone finishes were used throughout the interior, but with a modern twist. Asymmetri- cal carpet designs and hexagonal tiles mimic the sharp, angular features of the building. Thematic views are carried to the resident


apartment corridors, with each floor featur- ing a custom, full height mural of historical Salt Lake City imagery. Interior colors of blue, green, and rust were drawn from the native landscape. To emphasize the grand scale of the sur-


roundings, some residences have 13-foot ceil- ings and outdoor balconies. Windows are up to 10 feet wide and six feet high. The building has “very well-designed


spaces with unique light fixtures and fur- nishings that create a high-end look,” said Senior Living by Design judge Amy Fouts,


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