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Resources Resources


SKILL-UP YOUR STUDENTS


What do your pupils need to succeed at school, work and life? The Skills Builder Partnership has identified eight essential transferable skills


D


esigned by former teachers, working in partnership with employers, Skills Builder is a not-for-profit social enterprise


which equips everyone with the skills to succeed. It was set up in 2009 and has worked closely with industry experts to develop training programmes for teachers. These are centred around how to teach eight essential skills: listening, speaking, problem-solving, creativity, staying positive, aiming high, leadership and teamwork. Backed by the Careers & Enterprise


Company, the National Literacy Trust, the Gatsby Foundation, Business in the Community and more than 200 other organisations, Skills Builder fundraises to cover the majority of its costs, with some schools, colleges, employers and other organisations paying for their programmes. However, Skills Builder offers around 400 fully-funded places on its annual flagship education programme: The Accelerator. Places are available to


state-maintained primary, secondary and special schools in the UK that have not previously been on the programme. The lead member of staff will become a


skills leader. They receive dedicated support from Skills Builder’s team of former teachers to embed the eight essential skills in a strategic way that suits their school, whether within schemes of work, SEN activities, pastoral time or designated skills days. All staff in the school will also have access to bespoke training and the Skills Builder Hub, which provides a wealth of resources and online tools such as 15-minute lesson activities, short videos and project ideas. For Treasa Crumley, aspirations lead at


New Silksworth Academy in Sunderland, having a funded place on the Skills Builder Accelerator has had a huge impact: ‘Our infant and junior provision was amalgamated five years ago when we became an academy – and since then we have had a strong focus on essential


skills and learning behaviour. The main benefit of Skills Builder is that all the fantastic resources are on hand in the online hub and we can simply click on a level to gain access to skills teaching tools that are appropriate for that year group or individual pupil.’ ‘We use the resources to teach skills


across the curriculum. For example, there are lots of short videos that you can use as lesson starters. We also drew on resources from the hub to run a Challenge Day called Operation Moonbase, where the children used the eight essential skills to create a new planet, plus we ran a Year 5 project for pupils to design and create their own fitness video.’ ‘Once you have input initial data for


your pupils, you can use the hub to analyse how far every class has improved and what areas you need to intervene on. I teach Key Stage 1, where we now have a huge focus on speaking and listening. The skills are pitched at the children’s level, so they are able to participate, agree, disagree or state their opinion. It’s a great way of rewarding children too, and our pupils work towards bronze, silver and gold benchmarks every half-term.’ n Applications for 2022-23 open in spring 2022. To find out more and register interest go to skillsbuilder.org/accelerator


FundEd AUTUMN 2021 53


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