search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Cover story


SENERGY Rethink your TRATEGY


It’s not easy to decarbonise your school when funding is limited. But developing an energy strategy is an important step towards cutting waste, freeing up cash and allowing you to explore further options


y 2050, schools are expected to become net zero carbon consumers. As part of this, they have been advised to develop an energy management strategy which will deliver cost and carbon savings. Academies have been set specific targets of reducing consumption by 15% and emissions by 40% by 2030. Yet many schools still don’t know exactly when, where and how they are consuming energy, meaning that valuable resources and


money are being wasted. Clearly this impacts on bills, particularly when energy prices are so volatile. Indeed, energy costs are often the second highest annual expenditure for schools after wages. The good news is that it’s possible to make savings


of upwards of 20% through carbon reduction and energy efficiency measures. While older buildings may be more difficult to retro-fit, even the simplest measures can make a difference. From draft- proofing windows to improvements in your energy infrastructure, there are options to suit all budgets and schools. In this cover story, FundEd has collaborated with


school funding consultant Tim Warneford to guide you through the process of how to plan an energy strategy (overleaf). We look at what makes a zero-carbon building (page 17), explore the funding options for solar power (page 15) and profile successful school case studies.


FundEd AUTUMN 2021 13


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60