search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Continued from page 26


few installations throughout Europe would have to be monitored by authorities. This would also lead to a significant upgrade of the quality of EU waste statistics and anticipating possible implementation problems through an “early warning” procedure.


Last but not least, an EU wide common target would result in a level playing field within the waste oil sector.


Result Target - Base Oil 2025


3. Challenges Aside from the lack of knowledge about advantages of regeneration, the industry also has to cope with volatile pricing at international crude oil markets and USD exchange rates. Also, the availability of suitable waste oil is limited by its alternative use as fuel.


4. Regeneration Target´s Achievements Higher recycling rates would result in excess of 0.5 million tons of regenerated base oils plus by-products and increased sales of more than 800 million euros per year. Recycling targets for waste oils support the global competitiveness of EU lubricant SMEs.


Waste Oil 2025 Who pays that bill?


In fact no one, as unjustified profits gained for mixing treated waste fuel into large volumes of commodity fuels (e.g. bunker fuel) would be eliminated. Virgin producers may adjust their large product portfolio from base oils to more fuels.


4. Summary The European regeneration industry is capable and prepared to increase its market share up to 30% of the total base oil market. Its obvious contribution to the targeted Circular Economy and sustainability considerations, economic, social and environmental advantages as well as the use of “Best Available Technologies” to produce high-quality base oils from waste oil represent a distinct landmark in Europe.


Further qualified working places would be added to the sector. Currently, there are about 1,000 – 1,200 people directly employed in re-refineries and 2,500 – 3,000 in the collection of waste oils.


Recycling targets would lead to investment opportunities of more than 500 million euros.


Estimates indicate that regenerated waste oils can save up to 700 million barrels of crude oil annually, making the EU industry and society less vulnerable to high prices, market volatility and the political situation in supplying countries.


Using modern regeneration technologies, CO2 emissions (kg of


CO2 per ton of base oil) can be reduced by more than 50% as compared to the virgin production of base oil.


Other than the energetic use as fuel, modern regeneration technologies remove all contaminants from waste oil and regenerated base oils are registered according to REACH.


The effective recycling of waste oils to base oil is completely in line with the rationale of the EU Circular Economy. Furthermore, the focus on regeneration would also support EU waste regulators by clarifying and simplifying processes/measurement methods. Only a


28 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.141 OCTOBER 2017


GEIR is the European waste oil refining industry section of the Union of the European Lubricants Industry (UEIL) and represents 17 waste oil re-refineries in 8 Member States, i.e.: Germany, UK, Italy, Spain, Denmark, Greece, Portugal and Bulgaria. GEIR member companies are active throughout Europe in supporting the collection and the re-refining of waste oils back to valuable base oils as raw materials for lubricants. About 80% of Europe’s waste oil re-refining industry is represented by GEIR.


Christian Hartmann President of GEIR


LINK www.geir-rerefining.org


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68