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121°C. The other test conditions remain unchanged. The test method is designed to measure resistance to oxidation by determining the change in viscosity. In this test, the same glassware required by the D 943 test is used. 300 ml of the test lubricant is measured into the tube. The glass inlet tube from D 943 is used to introduce the air into the test lubricant. The entire assembly is placed in an oil bath at 95°C, (121°C). Dry air is bubbled through the sample at 10 l/h for a period of 312 hours. At the end of the test the final viscosity and precipitation number are determined. The appearance of the test tube and oil may be inspected for evidence of oxidation.


Qualifying industrial gear oils give 0-6% viscosity increase in test. Though unspecified, cleanliness of the glassware is very important for today’s industrial gear oils. It is felt that glassware cleanliness is an indication of the lubricant’s thermal stability.


SUMMARY


The purpose of oxidation testing is to study and evaluate the oxidation and thermal performance of formulated lubricants under severe simulated operating conditions in order to predict the performance of those lubricants in real world applications. There are two essential ways to test lubricants: bench testing and field testing.


Bench testing studies the performance of lubricants under simulated conditions and field testing predicts lubricant performance in actual equipment. Because of the high costs that are often associated with field testing, bench testing becomes the choice to study and evaluate lubricants. Bench testing can be used as a cost-effective way to evaluate the performance of experimental or new additives and formulated lubricants. It can be used to compare the relative performance of different commercially available lubricants, and finally it can be used to assess the remaining, useful oxidation life of lubricants in service.


Field testing can be used to prove the performance of lubricants that have been evaluated in bench tests and have successfully met the bench test criteria.


Even if the correlation between oxidation stability test results obtained by bench testing and field testing have not been systematically established, many oxidation and thermal stability tests have been developed by ASTM International; IP, The Institute of Petroleum; DIN, Deutsches Institute for Normurs; ISO, International Standards Organisation, and other organisations. These tests are designed to evaluate performance of additives and lubricant systems including industrial lubricants.


National and international specifications like ISO, DIN, ASTM, SAE as well as OEM specifications, Denison, US Steel, Cincinnati Milacron, Poclain, Vickers, Siemens, Mitsubishi, and General Electric give limits which are a great help as a guideline in the interpretation of test results.


References [1] J. DENIS, J. BRIANT, J.-C. HIPEAUX., 1997, Physico-chimie des lubrifiants, analyses et essais. Editions Technip, PARIS


[2] Gerald J. Cochrac, Syed Q. A. Rizvi, 2003, Fuels and lubricants handbook – oxidation of lubricants and fuels, chapter 30, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.


[3] S.P. Srivastava, 2014, Developments in Lubricant technology, TJ1077.S74, Edition Wiley, India


[4] ASTM test methods


For more information contact : Mr. Vincent Bouillon Sales Manager vincent.bouillon@bfblab.com


LINK www.bfblab.com


22


LUBE MAGAZINE NO.141 OCTOBER 2017


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