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NEWS


European Parliament seeks ban on single-use plastics


The European Parliament has voted to adopt draft plans to ban the use of single-use plastic items, such as plates, cutlery, straws, balloon sticks and cotton buds, across the EU from 2021. The move is driven by concern over marine litter, which MEPs said is com- prised of 80% plastic. The draft plans also include a ban on products made from oxo-degradable plastics and EPS fast food containers. Member states will have to reduce consump- tion of other items for which no alternatives currently exist by least 25% by 2025 (including single-use burger boxes, sandwich boxes, and containers for fruit, vegeta- bles, desserts and ice creams). They will also be asked to draft national plans to encourage the use of products for multiple use, re-use and recycling. Other plastics, such as


European vote targets plastics drinking straws and oxo-degradables


beverage bottles, will have to be collected separately and recycled at a rate of 90% by 2025. Waste from plastic cigarette filters will have to be reduced by 50% by 2025 and 80% by 2030, while member states must also ensure that at least 50% of lost or abandoned plastic fishing gear is collected each year, with a recycling target of at least 15% by 2025. Cigarette filters and fishing gear are two of the most common elements of marine pollution.


“We have adopted the most ambitious legislation against single-use plastics. It is essential in order to protect the marine environ- ment and reduce the costs of environmental damage attributed to plastic pollu- tion in Europe, estimated at €22bn by 2030,” said rapporteur Frédérique Ries, MEP.


Plastic packaging


association Europen said it supports “measures that address the problem of plastic pollution effectively,


that are harmonised and implementable by member states and industry”. However, it repeated its con- cerns that certain elements of the resolution “have not been adequately examined and might not achieve [their] objectives”. In particular, Europen Managing Director Virginia Janssens, expressed concern over the proposed removal of internal market safeguards for measures that cover packaging items. “This will weaken policy coherence with other EU rules on waste and packag- ing. The Packaging & Packaging Waste Directive, with its harmonised essen- tial requirements, should remain the sole appropriate legislation governing design and marking requirements applicable to all packaging,” she said. � www.europarl.europa.euwww.europen-packaging.eu


Plastivaloire to buy TransNav in US


France’s Plastivaloire Group has signed a memorandum of understanding to acquire TransNav, which has plastics production facilities in Michigan and Kentucky, in the US, and Puebla, Mexico. This is expected to be completed by the end of 2018, subject to the approval of the US authorities. TransNav should end the year with


sales of $105m. About 80% of its business is in the automotive industry. It makes components, notably suspension systems, spoilers, and fuel system and interior trim assemblies, for major OEMs,


8 INJECTION WORLD | November/December 2018


like General Motors, Chrysler, Ford and Tesla, and specialised equipment manufacturers, like Plastic Omnium, Ti Automotive Group and Magna. Plastivaloire described this as “a


seamless fit for [its] international expan- sion strategy to move its operations closer to major production hubs, with a focus on the automotive industry”, as well as taking it into the US for the first time. The group already has a Mexican facility in the major automotive production hub of San Luis Potosi. � www.groupe-plastivaloire.com


www.injectionworld.com


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK


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