search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
AUTOMOTIVE SURFACES | INNOVATION


Hard and soft options for car surfaces


The latest advances in injection moulding technologies and materials for Class A automotive interiors and exteriors were shown by exhibitors at Fakuma 2018. By Peter Mapleston


Material and process technologies dedicated to production of interior and exterior components in cars continue to improve. They will take weight out of vehicles, they will make them more attractive, and they will enable the creation of new designs adapted to information and illumination systems quite unlike anything that has been seen on our roads before. The Fakuma plastics exhibition in Friedrichshafen, Germany, in October was the venue for numerous new introductions and upgrades. So what is on the table for interior and exterior vehicle designers and engineers to choose from? Here is a look at some of the options. Engel continues to optimise the DecoJect


process for production of injection moulded automotive interior parts with integral decorative foils, which it began developing with Benecke- Kaliko (now part of Continental) a few years ago, and which it unveiled to the public at K 2016. This in-mould graining process, which uses roll-fed TPO foils between 0.25 and 0.5 mm thick, produces high-quality soft surfaces that need no painting afterwards. The grain of the surface is imparted by the mould. The partners envisage applications in parts such as door panels, various consoles and boxes, seat backs and the like. The process has since been expanded to include DecoJect Soft, which unsurprisingly produces a softer finish, using foils laminated with a


www.injectionworld.com


foam backing, bring their total thickness to between 2 and 3 mm thick. Because the foils are so thick, they are preheated on both sides just before they are formed in the female half of the injection mould. “We originally expected applications with thinner films would progress faster, but the call has been more for softer, thicker films,” says Engel’s Sales Manager (Technologies), Michael Fischer. Prototype evaluations with DecoJect are ongoing at several customers, with one close to industriali- sation, possibly in 2019 or 2020. This is just one technology connected with film


decoration that Engel is working on. At Fakuma, it premiered a variant of its Foilmelt in-mould decora- tion (IMD) process, using films from Leonhard Kurz, in which the film is thermoformed in the injection mould, the decoration remains attached to the film, and the part surface texture comes from the film rather than the mould surface. “We get the economics of the roll-to-roll


process, without an external preforming step,” says Fischer. Kurz, for its part, says the process, which it calls IMD Varioform, enables decoration on complex 3D geometries that until now have been difficult to obtain cost-effectively. The Engel production cell, which also involved in-mould trimming of the finished part, included a test mould that will be used for further trials at Engel’s en- larged technology centre at its headquarters in


November/December 2018 | INJECTION WORLD 15


Main image: Leonhard Kurz showed its newest


day-and-night decoration at Fakuma 2018


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81