search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
NEWS


Automotive suppliers warn about Brexit stockpiling


Associations representing Europe’s automotive manufacturers and suppliers have issued a joint warning about the potentially far-reaching impacts of a “no-deal Brexit” scenario on their sector. It could, they said, “threaten their very business model”. “Our members are


already making contingency plans and are looking for warehouse spaces to stockpile parts,” stated Erik Jonnaert, Secretary-General of the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), which represents the 15 major Europe-based car, van, truck and bus manufac- turers. “However, the space required to stockpile for more than a short time would be absolutely huge – and expensive.”


Car parts will be held up at border crossings if the UK does not reach an EU exit agreement by the end of March 2019


Jonnaert further warned


that some ACEA members were planning a temporary post-Brexit production shutdown. However, he said, “no amount of contingency planning can realistically cover all the gaps left by the UK’s withdrawal from the EU on WTO terms”. These


would mean a 10% tariff on cars, when industry margins are already lower than that. “Automotive components


often cross borders several times before the final product reaches the customer, and that includes Channel crossings. Any change in the level of


integration of the value chain will have an adverse effect on the competitive- ness of individual compa- nies and the sector as a whole,” said Sigrid de Vries, Secretary-General of the European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA). The just-in-time manufac- turing model, including just-in- sequence delivery and production means that millions of parts are deliv- ered to plants every day, ACEA and CLEPA added. It is estimated that 1,100 EU trucks cross the Channel to deliver to car and engine plants to the UK, which means that even short hold-ups at customs will cause huge disruption. � www.acea.behttps://clepa.eu/


New hybrid liquid filter module


Mann+Hummel has developed a plastic- aluminium hybrid design for use in highly stressed automotive applications, notably pressure-loaded liquid filter modules for oil and fuel. This, the company said, gives plastic “the necessary robustness for these challenging applications”, while creating a system that “exceeds the performance of the individual materials”.


Plastics have been used in passenger car filter modules since 2003, but modules made of aluminium are still used in commercial vehicles because of the significantly higher loads they are subject- ed to. Mann+Hummel said that it achieved this landmark by developing a technology that combines the mechanical strength of metal with the flexible design capability of


4


plastic. An aluminium skeleton, needed for stability at highly stressed points, is contained in a plastic functional sheath, in which all the liquid-carrying elements are arranged, including the filter element and liquid guide. The connecting elements for the fuel inlet and outlet can be moulded directly from plastic. n Mann + Hummel has appointed Werner Lieberherr as its new CEO. He previously headed B/E Aerospace until its takeover by Rockwell Collins in April 2017. � www.mann-hummel.com


Mann+Hummel’s plastic-aluminium hybrid liquid filter module for commercial vehicles


INJECTION WORLD | November/December 2018 www.injectionworld.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81