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ENGINEERING THERMOPLASTICS | MATERIALS


short-lived Itera polypropylene pedal bike from the early 1980s (an example is now on view in the Museum of Failure in Helsingborg). The e-bike contains around 7kg of the compound, chosen for its stiffness (Ixef is the most rigid PA on the market) and a surface finish that Solvay Technical Marketing Engineer Marc Schelles says is far superior to that achievable with other glass-rein- forced compounds.


Recyclate Solvay Performance Polyamides has secured Kärcher, the German company specialising in cleaning equipment and pressure washers, as a user for its Technyl 4earth PA 66, produced from indus- trial recyclate derived from offcuts during produc- tion of airbags. Kärcher, a long-standing customer of Solvay’s, is using a 30% short glass reinforced grade for lances in its consumer products. Solvay’s Engineering Plastics BU Global Business


Director, Gerald Durski, says the mechanical proper- ties of the 4earth grade are the same as those of the virgin compound that Kärcher was using before. The spray lances must meet a range of demanding requirements, including high pressure resistance, hydrolytic stability, very high impact strength, printability and compatibility with cleaning agents. Daniel Carmine Manocchio, Manager of the


group Material Technology at Kärcher’s Central Research and Development, says the company has manufactured more than one million high-pressure spray lances in Technyl 4earth. Kärcher is now evaluating further use of Technyl 4earth throughout its portfolio. Technyl 4earth is available in various grades with a glass content up to 50%. Solvay says its propri- etary recycling technology “ensures both consist- ent material quality and security of supply to meet fast-growing demand for more sustainable high-performance applications in a wide range of markets, from automotive components to electrical appliances, and consumer and industrial goods.” Compounds are made at a Solvay operation in


Gorzów, Poland. Obtaining material from several sources, it starts with textile that has already been silicone-coated for the airbag application. The coating is removed, leaving a high-purity fibre. Durski says that, worldwide, possibly as much as 30,000 tonnes of waste is created in production of airbags, as circular blanks are cut from rectilinear feedstock. For the future, says Durski, Solvay hopes it will be possible to use post-consumer scrap from airbags, of which – in recent months at least – there has been excessive quantities, thanks in part to massive


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recalls. “There are many hurdles to overcome, but it is a compelling business model,” he says. Other polyamide companies are also involved in


production of materials containing recyclate using industrial textile waste. They include Celanese, via the Nilit (previously Frisetta) operation it bought some months ago; and Domo, whose products are based on PA6. Domo has also begun offering carbon fibre reinforced Econamid, called Econa- mid Air (referencing its low density). Also new from Domo is Domamid XS, a new


range of glass-reinforced PA66/6T alloys aimed at metal replacement in diverse applications. A representative cites bicycle pedals, pulleys and outboard engine covers. Grades have glass contents of 50, 60 and 65%. Finally, there is Domamid Fly, a new PA6-based


product range that incorporates aluminium silicate nano particles (added during polymerisation) rather than glass. Domo’s aim was to obtain an improved HDT (193°C under 0.45MPa load for one grade) and tensile properties (3.7GPa flexural modulus) without increasing the density of the material (1.12 g/cm3


). The company says the very


low dosage of the nano-clay confers very good dimensional stability and absence of warpage. “Innovative technology that allows perfect exfolia- tion of the nano-clay in the polymer matrix has led to outstanding properties,” it says.


CLICK ON THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION: � www.ascendmaterials.com � www.dow-dupont.com � www.solvay.com � www.dsm.com � www.emsgrivory.com � www.aschulman.com � www.polyplastics.com � www.basf.com � www.teknorapex.com � www.domochemicals.com � www.lanxess.com � www.akro-plastic.com


November/December 2018 | INJECTION WORLD 57


Above: The defunct Itera PP bike


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