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ENGINEERING THERMOPLASTICS | MATERIALS


Suppliers highlight alternatives to PA 66


Companies have developed reinforced polyamide 6 compounds


A shortage of polyamide 66, caused by global production capacity issues in adiponitrile (ADN) feedstock, is unlikely to be resolved for many months (see Injection World October 2018). It is not a surprise, then, that some innovative compounders are coming up with alternative solutions. One example is


Akro-Plastic, the producer of high-perfor- mance compounds based on various thermo- plastics, which has developed Akromid B+, a family of glass reinforced blends of PA6 with a long-chain polyamide, which is said to have strength properties around the same level as PA66 (depending on temperature) with the same level of glass fibre reinforcement. “We haven’t done this before because the


difference in price between PA 6 and 66 didn’t make it worthwhile,” says Thilo Stier, Head of Innovation and Sales. “But now it makes sense to modify PA6 in this way.” A portfolio with 30 to 50% glass fibre reinforced Akromid B+ compounds is already available for sampling, a grade with 60% glass is also under development. Akro-Plastic also offers a PA66-based material


that sells for under €3/kg. Its HR66 is actually a chemically coupled blend of PA66 and polypropyl- ene, which the company developed for improved resistance to zinc chloride. It has also found out that it is hydrolysis resistant. At Fakuma, Lanxess took the wraps off a new


PA6-based family of glass-reinforced compounds called Durethan Performance. They have especially good fatigue resistance. Lanxess is hoping for applications under the hood and also in furniture. Lanxess says the different grades are several times more resistant to fatigue under pulsating


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loads than standard products with the same glass fibre content. The first products in the product range are the thermally stabilised Durethan BKV30PH2.0, BKV35PH2.0, and BKV40PH2.0 compounds with glass fibre contents of 30, 35, and 40%, as well as the impact resistant modified Durethan BKV130P com- pound, which has 30% glass. “We are targeting


applications in automobiles,


such as air-intake systems and oil-filter modules or parking brakes,” says Thomas Linder, an expert in materials development for Durethan at Lanxess. “There is also great application potential for housing and structural components of power tools, such as drilling or grinding machines. And with regard to the furniture industry, for example, parts of furniture locking systems could be manu- factured from the impact-resistant modified product type.”


In addition to the dynamic behaviour, the static mechanical profile of the new construction materials has also been improved. For example, they offer more tensile strength at higher tempera- tures than standard products with the same glass fibre content.


“Its mechanical properties makes the PA6- based Durethan Performance in many cases an alternative material for PA66 compounds,” says Linder, adding that any substitution can often be carried out without increasing the glass fibre content, product weight remains almost unaltered. Lanxess has investigated the dynamic behaviour


of the new compounds on a demonstrator resem- bling lightweight structural components. This “HiAnt” element is an injection-moulded U-shaped profile that is reinforced with ribs on the inside. Tests include three-point-bending fatigue Wöhler


November/December 2018 | INJECTION WORLD 59


Left: Akro-Plas- tic has intro- duced Akromid B+, a family of glass rein- forced blends of PA6 with a long-chain polyamide


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