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Mobil – Plastics Guide 2018


5 Switching hydraulic fluids


Once you’ve identified the most suitable hydraulic fluid you’ll need to drain out the existing fluid in order to make the upgrade. The process is quite straightforward from an operational perspective but there are important steps to follow to help make the switch seamless.


5.1 Compatibility


Before switching your injection moulding machines to a high performance hydraulic fluid it is first necessary to ensure that it is compatible with the fluid it is replacing. Co-mingling incompatible fluids can result in a detrimental loss of functionality that can reduce equipment performance and ultimately result in costly and avoidable maintenance. Testing can be organised via your lubricant supplier using a service such as ExxonMobil’s Mobil Serv Lubricant Analysis (MLSA), part of the Mobil Serv suite of test options. If the results reveal a compatibility issue it will be necessary to completely drain the old hydraulic fluid from your equipment before refilling.


5.2 Best practice


Even if no issues are spotted it is still good practice to fully remove the old fluid so as to ensure the new one is not diluted, which could result in a reduction of overall hydraulic performance.


ExxonMobil helped Kotronis Plastics make an


annual saving of more than €17,000 by switching its 40 Sumitomo Demag El-Exis SP 250 injection moulding machines to Mobil DTE™ 10 Excel 68 hydraulic oil. The move helped cut energy


consumption by 2.23%, safely extend oil drain intervals beyond 20,000 operating hours and reduce cycle times.1


Once drained it is advisable to flush the system to remove any build-up of sediment. Having refilled the tank, it should be left to settle before switching on as there is a risk that any remaining residues could be disturbed. This is especially important for older machines. In order to minimise disruption to plant processes it is advisable to switch hydraulic fluids during scheduled maintenance periods. Compatibility is dependent on a fluid’s chemistry and particularly its additive package. To help reduce potential risks, seeking professional advice is key.


11


1 This proof of performance is based on the experience of a single customer. Actual results can vary depending upon the type of equipment used and its maintenance, operating conditions and environment and any prior lubricant used.


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