search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
MATERIALS | ENGINEERING THERMOPLASTICS


BASF’s Ultramid Advanced T1000 with 35% glass fibre reinforcement shows higher chemical resistance compared to standard aliphatic PA66 polyamides when tested in contact to coolants at 135°C as well as retention of 50 % of initial strength for over 1,000 hours


The new material is available in two versions: for use in automotive applications such as engine cooling systems, as well as applications with direct contact with food and drinking water. Mann+Hummel already manufactures a cooling


water valve for Hyundai made of Grivory HT1VA-35 HYS. The part requires not only high hydrolysis resistance at elevated temperatures, but also very good resistance against cooling agents and high dimensional stability. “A further reason for the choice of Grivory HT1VA-35 HYS is its optimised demoulding capabilities,” says Ems-Grivory. “This means that the material enables use of complex mould geometry and undercuts improving the efficiency of the injection moulding process.” The company further notes that the material is also suitable for automotive electronics because the available “electro-friendly” stabilisation prevents problems with salt efflorescence and the corrosion it causes under warm and moist conditions. Also promoting hydrolysis resistance, but in


PBTs, is A. Schulman (now a LyondellBasell business). At Fakuma, it was talking about Schula- dur A HR2, which it says provides “second genera- tion” protection against hydrolysis. It was devel- oped especially for under-the-hood components in electric cars, where parts face high peak tempera- tures and need to resist notable impact loads. The supplier says the new material’s perfor- mance is proven in the long term 85/85 test, where specimens are exposed to 85% relative humidity at 85°C in a climatic chamber. More than 80% of the mechanical performance is retained after 2,000


52 INJECTION WORLD | November/December 2018


Comparison of long-term performance of 50% glass reinforced Ultramid Advanced T1000 with PA66 under constant loads at room temperature in presence of humidity (23 °C, 50 % relative humidity). BASF says the advantage is even more pronounced at higher temperatures


hours (84 days) of aging. This is combined with a CTI score of nearly 600 V. A. Schulman also points to good flow properties.


“Although the nominal melt volume rate is slightly higher than in comparable standard PBT com- pounds, internal injection moulding trials have proven that Schuladur A HR2 allows a 10% longer flow length when applying the same process parameter setting, combined with a very high melt stability,” it says. High-temperature polyamides have rivals in liquid crystal plastics, LCPs, in this area. At Fakuma, Polyplastics showed a new LCP with improved thermal resistance, for use in applications on EVs such as inverters. The new grade can take tempera- tures up to around 280°C, which is around 30°C higher than other types. This also makes it suitable for applications that need to withstand reflow soldering temperatures. A new member of DSM’s ForTii MX family of


materials for diecast metal-replacement, ForTii MX53T, is suitable for applications requiring resistance to low as well as high temperatures – down to -35°C and up to 150°C. This grade is optimised for complex structural parts, the original ForTii MX53 has a Tg of 160°C and is used for higher temperature applications and where stiffness is key. Other PPAs based on PA6T have a Tg in an unconditioned state of around 125°C, falling to around 95°C after conditioning. The DSM product has a Tg of over 125°C after conditioning. “This means that it is suitable for applications where designers want resistance to very hot and


www.injectionworld.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81