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MATERIALS | ENGINEERING THERMOPLASTICS


forced, highly heat-stabilised compound for outstanding mechanical performance, espe- cially at higher temperatures. Grades are available with different heat stabilisers. Metal replacement may not always require PPAs


Below: Kärcher has used Solvay’s Technyl 4earth PA 66 in a pressure washer lance


though. Teknor Apex has developed Creamid 240, which it bills as a new series of high-heat glass- reinforced PA 66 compounds that bridge the cost-performance gap between standard heat- resistant polyamides and costly specialty polymers for automotive and other metal-replacement parts. Creamid 240 has a maximum continuous-use temperature of 240°C. Unlike most other high- temperature polyamides, it can be processed using barrel and mould temperatures in the same region as those used for regular PA66. The compound depends on unspeci- fied additives for its performance. Markus Krippner, Director of Sales and Marketing with Teknor Germany, points out that this is not a form of shielding technology used on other types of polyamides modified to improve their heat resistance. This means that the tempera- ture does not have to rise to a certain point to trigger the shielding effect. Moulding conditions are “far


away” from the material’s degrada- tion temperature. The technology is valid for PA 66 reinforced with various levels of glass. Unreinforced grades show a maximum-use temperature rather lower, at around 200°C.


Teknor Apex recommends Creamid 240 compounds for automotive under-hood components such as charge air cooler end caps, air intake manifolds, quick-fit connectors, radiator end tanks, turbo air ducts and resonators, oil pump wheels, EGR valves, and thermostatic casings. Other possibilities include electronic connectors, diode carriers, and bobbins, as well as consumer products such as lamp sockets and connectors. “While metal-replacement continues to drive demand for polyamides in the automotive market, performance-boosting technologies such as turbocharged engines and advanced transmission systems place stricter requirements for heat resistance, chemical resistance, and reduced water absorption,” says Krippner. “These forces, along with the overriding industry effort to reduce vehicle weight, are driving Teknor Apex investment into new polyamide technologies.” Krippner also points out that Creamid 240 compounds exhibit flow properties that readily accommodate the complex or thin-wall parts or the


56 INJECTION WORLD | November/December 2018


Below: All-PPS coolant line


long flow paths that are often required for metal-re- placement. At Fakuma, Solvay introduced a new


extrusion grade of Ryton polyphenylene sulphide (PPS) which it says now enables it to offer a PPS package for automobile cooling lines and blow-by lines, since it already offers injection grades suitable for fittings on such lines. This is a family of unreinforced impact-modi- fied grades, which unusually gives them a certain flexibility. PPS is normally offered with glass reinforcement, and as such is quite rigid and brittle. Andreas Lutz, Area Development Manager, Automotive, Europe, says the development was driven by downsizing in the engine compartment, which is leading to an increasing number of hot spots. PPS has very good resistance to high temperatures and chemical fluids. The all-PPS solution provides an alternative to combinations of long-chain polyamides with metal and elastomer components. Developed in collaboration with a European OEMs, it is now being used by several Tier Ones.


On its stand at the show, Solvay Specialty


Polymers also showed an e-bike with frame and wheels all injection moulded in a 50% long glass fibre reinforced grade of its Ixef polyarylamide. Things have obviously come a long way since the


Notched Izod impact strength of (unconditioned) Technyl 4earth and standard PA66 grades from Solvay


www.injectionworld.com


PHOTO: SOLVAY


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