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ENGINEERING THERMOPLASTICS | MATERIALS


Development work by engineering plastics producers has led to a surge in new grades of polyamide 6 and 66, PA46, PPA and other materials for specific customer demands. By Peter Mapleston


New polyamide materials proliferate


Polyamides continue to hog the headlines in news on engineering thermoplastics. Whether it is new high-performance grades for electronics and metal replacement, or new developments in response to shortages in polyamide 66, there is an awful lot going on. Much of it was to be seen at the Fakuma show in Friedrichshafen, Germany, in mid-October. Polyamide 66 producer Ascend is addressing the


issue of how to take weight out of parts without compromising on mechanical properties such as stiffness. At the same time, says Senior Vice Presi- dent, Technology, Vikram Gopal, it is working on ways to improve NVH (noise, vibration and harsh- ness) properties. A new grade from its latest 400 Series of Vydyne polyamide 66 compounds, which contain glass fibre reinforcement and impact modifying additives, was unveiled at Fakuma. It shows improvements in notched and unnotched impact strength. Gopal notes that this is an applica- tion that can benefit from the water absorption of PA 66, as this reduces the glass transition temperature of the polymer, improving its damping properties.


www.injectionworld.com Vydyne 433H can be used for A, B and C pillar


stiffeners in the body in white, says Gopas, helping to reduce weight without sacrificing safety or comfort. These require not only stiffness and impact resistance, but also a high deflection temperature under load (DTUL, or HDT) to resist paint oven temperatures. Gopal says this stiffening concept is now becoming more mainstream. He also sees potential for the new material in engine mounts that improve NVH, especially in high-end vehicles. Such components need a material with low creep, high fatigue resistance, and good resistance to high temperatures and to automotive fluids. For automotive electrical and electronics


applications, Solvay Performance Polyamides (currently in the process of being acquired by BASF in a deal awaiting approval by the European Commission) has developed a family of “electro- friendly” high-purity, low-corroding materials for applications like electrified cooling systems, sensors and connectors, as well as high-power EV chargers. The range comprises six Technyl and


November/December 2018 | INJECTION WORLD 49


Main image: BASF says its new Ultramid Advanced T1000


compound group based on polyamide 6T/6I can


perform “1,000 tasks”


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