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AMERICA’S #1 CHOICE FOR SCHOOL BUS EXHAUST SYSTEMS


With more than 30,000 parts in stock for all makes and models, Auto-jet keeps your maintenance shop on schedule. And Auto-jet is your single source for radiators, DPFs, and EGRs too!


Public Outreach is Key In fall 2017, the San Antonio Independent School District issued an RFP


to invite a range of smart safety features and products for bus loading and unloading. This came at the behest of bus drivers who were concerned about how often they saw motorists drive around their stop-arms. Trans- portation General Manager Nathan Graf said some bus drivers would improvise and park their bus at an angle to the curb, to try to create a larger safety zone for exiting students. The district decided to go with Verra Mobility and rolled out a pilot in


August. Graf said he and his staff quickly saw a change in motorist behav- ior. A major public education campaign is part of the initiative. District representatives erected billboards, especially in high-risk traffic


areas, mailed out fliers and spoke at public events. Vinyl signs were also posted at every school campus, and there was considerable local media coverage. During the first two months of implementing the new technol- ogy, motorists received warnings, but were not fined. “Before we even started issuing warnings, motorists would see the camera


Steve Krizer Sales Manager


on the side of the bus and they would stop,” Graf said. Before the educational campaign, he said the district saw an average of 120 stop-arm violations a day. Now it sees about 100 violations daily, which Graf said is still too high. The school district receives 15 percent of the fines collected during the first year, and an additional 5 percent each year thereafter, with a maximum


Act in the Name of Safety Federal legislation was introduced in the House last


month to require the U.S. Department of Transportation to perform comprehensive research and reporting on the national school bus illegal passing issue. The deaths of three siblings last October in rural Rochester County, Indiana, prompted Rep. Jackie


Walorski to reach out to the National School Transportation Association to begin obtaining more information on school bus stop violations. On April 11 during a school bus safety demonstration at Rochester Schools Corporation, Walorski an- nounced she and Rep. Julia Brownley of California were introducing HR 1288, the “Stop for School Buses Act of 2019,” or STOP Act. NSTA said it supports the language that would call on the DOT to review illegal


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See Us At Booth #320 44 School Transportation News • MAY 2019


passing laws in all 50 states, including penalties and levels of enforcement, as well as the various technologies designed to punish violators or avoid an incident from occurring, in the first place. The STOP Act would also require the creation and im- plementation of a national public service campaign on school bus stop safety and a review of current driver education materials. It would also result in published recommendations and best practices. “Every driver has a responsibility to exercise caution when students are pres- ent, and that includes never passing a school bus that is stopped with red lights flashing or its stop arm extended,” Walorski said last month. “The Stop for School Buses Act will help our states and local communities take the most effective ac- tions to prevent illegal passing of school buses and ensure students are safe when traveling to and from school.” Read more at stnonline.com/go/53.


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