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FEATURE


Having an automated time and attendance system in place provides managers with real-time, reliable information on their employees’ productivity and enables them to quickly spot any issues – good or bad, and act upon them. This visibility is all they need to implement an extremely effective performance-related incentive scheme.


“The ugly side of worker monitoring is seen when companies have


accumulated information, but don’t know how to interpret it.”


The ugly side of worker monitoring is seen when companies have accumulated information, but don’t know how to interpret it or what to do with it. This often results in kneejerk reactions which focus on negative information by issuing verbal warnings or disciplinary action. It’s common knowledge that low paid workers have to be motivated to do more than just show up and go through the actions, or they will simply jump ship at the promise of an extra 20p per hour. High staff turnover is almost expected in this sector where cleaners and maintenance staff are often overlooked, despite them being the most expensive asset.


Imagine a world where 90% of a company’s cleaning workers could become just 5% more productive from feeling happy and valued at work. Imagine if those workers stayed with that company an average of two years longer than its nearest competitors. Imagine that they are all embracing wearable technology that feeds back information on how well they do their job. – And when they do well, they are rewarded. Think of it as a motivational ‘FitBit’ for work.


“Imagine a world where 90%


of a company’s cleaning workers could become just 5% more


productive from feeling happy and valued at work.”


These people are often the most expensive asset, at the forefront of a business, they are what clients see, and if they aren’t leaving a good impression, that ultimately comes back to management.


Once employees can see that accurate data tracking is improving the accuracy of their wages, leading to incentive payments and an understanding of their team performance in a leader board against peers, a cultural shift starts. When supervisors realise that this accurate data enables them to manage their employees better, more efficiently and against their peers, that shift starts to escalate.


Many of our Ezitracker customers have noticed that when employees know that their attendance is being monitored, overall attendance and punctuality generally improves. Reports and dashboards allow managers to focus on ‘no shows’ and early departures, because they know savings can be made by eradicating lateness’s or early departures. But conversely, by rewarding employees that are doing the extra hours and increasing productivity and communicating this to wider teams, many companies have achieved significant results. Those contractors now see employee retention figures that are measured in years, not months.


The sector is under increasing pressure to provide accountability for workers. This, coupled with tighter service level agreements, means that ensuring that cleaning staff are on-site as planned is critical. Progression in technology is facilitating a shift for cleaning providers to deliver better value by managing contracts and mobile workforces and people more efficiently. It’s easy for cleaning service providers to manage teams of staff across multiple sites remotely, whilst bringing cost savings, and adding to the bottom line by using the data available to create a working environment that drives happiness, wellbeing, loyalty, and staff retention.


www.ezitracker.com


www.tomorrowsfm.com


TOMORROW’S FM | 65


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