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CONSTRUCTION & BIM SOLID AS A LOCK In this digital age, it’s easy to get caught up in smart devices that alleviate time


and stress. But for industries such as construction, traditional products are often more practicable, argues Codelocks.


According to Logic Fire and Security, the UK construction industry loses £800m each year due to burglary, vandalism and neglect. Research undertaken by the Chartered Institute of Building revealed that 92% of construction workers and management are affected weekly, monthly or yearly by theft.


Any access control system for a construction site needs to be durable enough to withstand building site conditions and robust enough for frequent and constant access by a multitude of workers.


Securing sites The exposure of construction sites leaves them vulnerable, meaning that access control is paramount. One way that construction companies can secure their sites is by investing in mechanical coded locks.


The locks offer a level of control that acts as a barrier to unwanted and unauthorised visitors. With additional heavy security, mechanical locks assist in controlling the access and safeguarding areas. This is particularly advantageous given the alarming amount of money that is lost each year to these crimes. The heavy-duty nature of mechanical locks presents them as the obvious candidate for sites holding expensive construction equipment and building materials.


Reduce lost man hours Installing a mechanical coded lock dismisses the need for


46 | TOMORROW’S FM


keys, eliminating the need to issue and manage multiple keys. Site employees no longer have to carry individual keys on them which can often get lost at busy sites.


Installation is quick, which is convenient for sites who need to start immediate work. Mechanical locks can be easily retrofitted onto existing doors, gates and entrances, meaning that site managers don’t have to install entirely new entrances, saving time and money too.


Additionally, mechanical coded locks reduce time wasted waiting for access to the site, as the code can be communicated quickly,


enabling workers to get on with their day-to-day activities.


Getting the job done Mechanical coded locks are a terrific option for those who want a simple but effective security system that can be used in any environment


where a large volume of staff or visitors require access. As such, they’re beneficial for electricians, engineers and construction workers who are continuously entering and leaving the site at varying times throughout the day.


“The exposure of construction sites leaves them vulnerable, meaning that access control is paramount.”


From a health and safety point of view, using a coded lock on the entrance to a building site helps keep the public safely out of the way of construction hazards and site workers free to carry out their jobs uninterrupted. Some mechanical locks can be set to Code Free access – ideal at high traffic times, such as the beginning and end of shifts or when materials are delivered to the site.


Mechanical locks don’t utilise smart technology, so they’re cost-effective. As they are easy to retrofit onto existing doors, gates and storage units, it means less disruption for clients. So, if you’re considering updating your site security, don’t banish mechanical locks to the bottom of the pile.


www.codelocks.co.uk twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


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