search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FEATURE


Whether starting out or expanding an existing installation, here are some guidelines:


1. Bear in mind an EV charger is the tip of the iceberg in an electrical infrastructure. Connecting it entails a review of everything from how much it draws from your site’s electrical supply to whether internal distribution system upgrades will be required.


2. Select an EV charge-point maker with a product range to cover all your requirements, not only now but in the future, preferably one that also offers infrastructure solutions such as energy management systems. This means you will have one supplier, guaranteed compatibility and a fully integrated network.


3. Remember, high quality installation is as important as high-quality equipment. DC fast chargers are more complicated to install and safety is paramount.


4. Use an installer certified by the charge-point maker – the former will have all the qualifications, not only from the manufacturer, but will also possess essential accreditation from key institutions including NICEIC and BS EN ISO 9001:2000.


5. Investing first in a thorough site survey from a qualified installer will identify and enable issues to be addressed now rather than (expensively) later.


many ‘smart’ functions. These include management of loads, charge detail records, circuit breaker status, postponed charge, user privilege configuration and payment methods, diagnosis and reporting.


All these charger functions may be seamlessly linked to the energy management system and in turn, a computer-aided facilities management (CAFM) system. This will streamline strategic and operational monitoring, control and reporting across the whole site. The highly integrated technology also assists with utility cost management by balancing or optimising energy supply and demand in relation to tariffs set by the external energy provider.


In reality, fast charging may only be required for those business users constantly using their EV during the day. Before writing a specification, carefully study and analyse what users actually need now and what may be required in the future. For example, someone who starts work at eight ‘o clock in the morning and leaves at five may be content with slow or normal EV charging. A mix of normal and fast charging is likely.


www.icee.co.uk www.tomorrowsfm.com


6. Check the installer will also provide reliable on-demand and preventative maintenance – if issues occur, it avoids the installer blaming the maintenance company, and vice versa.


EV charging – and fast charging in particular - adds another level of demand on energy allowances and electrical distribution within your domain. As such, it may trigger investment in an energy management system. When installing or adding EV charging facilities, the system will not only counter the risk of overload, but also cost-effectively optimise supply and demand across the estate you are responsible for, and bring beneficial cost-savings.


TOMORROW’S FM | 27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76