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CLEANING MICRO MARVEL


Today’s advanced production processes are enabling the creation of cleaning materials that are sustainable yet highly effective. James Taylor, Marketing Director for EMEIA (Specialities) at Berry, looks at the rising demand for disposable, cost-effective cleaning products.


The use of technology in the FM sector is on the rise. The Internet of Things (IoT) has enabled facilities managers to identify individual light point failures on their smart phone, to monitor equipment run times and predict potential maintenance problems.


“The WHO has identified antimicrobial resistances as an


increasingly serious threat to global public health.”


In the washroom, sensors can detect when a product is about to run out, then the data stored can be analysed to create a more accurate cleaning schedule. One US company is using drones to clean the exterior of multi- storey buildings, arguing that it eliminates the requirement for scaffolding platforms while reducing time spent and eradicating potential safety issues for the workforce.


54 | TOMORROW’S FM


While such innovations are far from commonplace in most routines, there is no doubt that technology is enhancing the capabilities of everyday cleaning materials. Advanced manufacturing processes produce disposable cloths that are capable of removing harmful bacteria without the use of chemicals; others are strong enough to clean industrial machinery and wipe away grease yet remain soft to the touch.


A short history of microfibre Microfibre is technically not a new innovation – in fact, there is some doubt over precisely where and when it was invented. Some schools of thought claim it was created by the English in the mid-1980s, others argue that the Swedes came up with the first commercially viable microfibre product in the early 1990s.


However, there is evidence to suggest it was originally created in Japan more than 40 years ago, by scientists looking to create a new fabric for women’s swimwear. Rather than being a lightweight, comfortable material though, the microfibre actually absorbed water, making it


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