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PEST CONTROL


ENEMY AT THE GATE


Pest control can be compared with going into battle – technicians have to work strategically to predict the worst-case scenarios and try to be one step ahead of their adversary suggests Cleankill.


It goes without saying that the larger your site, the more places there are for pests to gather, hide and find ways into your premises. Despite all efforts, we can’t control everything – pests like fleas and cockroaches are excellent travellers. Cockroaches can hitch a lift in cardboard packaging and fleas and other biting insects can attach themselves to employees’ clothing if they are using public transport.


That’s why it’s important to use a provider that has a stable workforce so your technician gets to know your site thoroughly and can predict aspects of buildings and their surroundings that might cause problems and offer professional advice. For instance, overgrown vegetation


can provide the ideal hiding place for rodents. Or rubbish storage areas may need a re-think if they are attracting rats and mice.


There is no guarantee of a pest free establishment. Modern building techniques like using stud partitioning, breeze blocks, false flooring and main service voids, often lend themselves to creating the perfect harbourages for pests. So what should you be doing to limit the risk of pest infestations?


Quality of service over price Some FMs can be misled by cheap quotes and then find the provider then adds on unexpected extras which mean the seemingly cheaper quote wasn’t cheaper after all.


44 | TOMORROW’S FM twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


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