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MicroscopyPioneers


was awkward to use, it made artistic renderings significantly sim- pler to produce and quickly grew in popularity. Te Wollaston prism is fundamentally important to interfer-


ometry and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. DIC is an excellent mechanism for rendering contrast in transpar- ent specimens. It is a beam-shearing interference system in which the reference beam is sheared by a minuscule amount, generally somewhat less than the diameter of an Airy disk. Te technique produces a monochromatic shadow-cast image that effectively dis- plays the gradient of optical paths for both high and low spatial frequencies present in the specimen. Tose regions of the specimen where the optical paths increase along a reference direction appear brighter (or darker), whereas regions where the path differences decrease appear in reverse contrast. As the gradient of optical path difference grows steeper, image contrast is dramatically increased. As a skilled optician, Wollaston created a doublet lens con-


sisting of two plano-convex lenses with their flat surfaces fac- ing the object plane. Tis important lens design was refined by Charles Chevalier in 1830 and later perfected by Joseph J. Lister as a high-resolution achromatic lens. In 1829, the doublet lenses, as well as the simple microscope that employed them, were described posthumously. Tat same year Wollaston’s description of a single-lens condenser used to funnel light into a microscope with increased intensity, improving the overall resolution, was also published. Many compound microscopes used Wollaston’s system although he did not live to see them, and until recently, microprojectors employed a virtually identical construction.


Microscope Temperature Control  Precise temperature control at the sample; in the FOV  Fits in the slide holder


 No microscope modifications


VAHEAT is Here!


www.boselec.com | vaheat@boselec.com


MEO Engineering Company, Inc. High Technology on a Small Scale since 2004


Consumables & Service FIB or SEM, any OEM


Reduce maintenance costs with PBS&T™ components:


• Extractors • Suppressors • Apertures


• Precursor Refills • Etching (XeF2


, Bromine, Iodine)


• Deposition (C, Pt, W, Mo, Cu, SiOx) • Custom Chemistries


We can support you with: • DIY maintenance training • On-site service and repairs • Installation and relocation • High voltage power supplies • Ion and electron optics • Preventive maintenance • Custom-made components • Aftermarket upgrades • Process development • Remote support


www.fibsemproducts.com info@partbeamsystech.com


2020 January • www.microscopy-today.com


MEO Engineering Company, Inc. High Technology on a Small Scale since 2004


Precursor Gas Injector FIB or SEM, any OEM


GALEX Instruments® Deposition Solution


D-GIS


• Four materials on the same port • Easy to install, align and operate • User-exchangeable precursor cartridges • Designed for safety and compliance • Standard precursors: Pt, W, Mo, C, SiOx • Custom chemistries available • Gas assisted etching version is available • UHV-compatible version upon request • Application development support


Carbon deposition on porous thin film substrate


FIB-deposited Pt


E-beam Pt deposition within alignment and tracking notches, and over sample


Pt FIB and SEM deposition for 3D slice-and-view tomography. ZEISS Crossbeam 340 with FIBICS Atlas Software and GALEX Instruments® system (D-GIS)


www.fibsemproducts.com info@partbeamsystech.com


35


gas injection


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