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The latest news, keeping residents and harbour users up to date.


BY CAPTAIN GEOFF HOLLAND • HARBOURMASTER/CEO www.dartharbour.org A


s I write this, we are looking forward to the easing of the Covid restrictions. Boats have been able to move and the river has started to come alive. With


this thought in mind, I would like to remind you to look out for other river users including those not in boats. Stand Up Paddle boards (SUPs) have become increasingly popular. I often see out of my window that buoyancy aids are not being worn. The water at this time year is still very cold!


The RNLI have some useful tips for your safety.


SIMPLE TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR TIME PADDLE BOARDING ●You should wear a suitable personal flotation device. This can be a buoyancy aid or a lifejacket. Choose one that still allows you plenty of movement so you can paddle freely. Not only will it keep you afloat, but it will also help give you time to recover should you fall in – and chances are you will!


● Bringing your phone to take some photos? Make sure you keep it in a waterproof pouch. That way it won’t get wet, and you can use it to call for help in an emergency too.


●Check the weather forecast and tide times before you set out. If the water is too choppy, you might find it difficult, especially if you are a beginner. And be aware, the conditions can change quickly.


●Avoid offshore winds. They will quickly blow your paddleboard far out to sea, which can make it extremely tiring and difficult to paddle back to shore.


● Wear suitable clothing for the time of year. In the winter, you will want to use a wet or dry suit. In the summer, you might be able to get away with a swim suit. But if you are going to be in the water for a long time, you might want to upgrade to something that keeps you warm.


● You should always use a paddleboard with a leash. There’s nothing more frustrating than having to swim after your paddleboard if you fall off. The leash will also help you stay connected to your board if you get into trouble and help you float.


●If you can, always go with a friend. It’s more fun, and they can help you if you get into difficulty.


●If you are going out alone, always tell someone where you’re going and when you’ll be back. Don’t leave the house without a mobile phone or communication device.


For more information visit our website https://www.dartharbour.org/ about-dart-harbour/port-safety/enjoying-the-water-safely/


As the weather improves it is good to see more people getting out on the water for the first time this year. But don’t forget we will most likely end up towing more than 20 vessels back to their berths before the end of May. In most cases the reason for a tow is caused by mechanical failure so please run your engine for 30 minutes before leaving the berth on your first trip of the season. Check cooling water strainers, impellors and the instrument readings before departure.


And finally, let’s hope the


government’s road map progresses as expected and we can all enjoy time out on the water this summer.


Captain Geoff Holland CEO/Harbour Master


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