search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
35


a leaky ridge tent for two and no torch led us to an empty shop in Foss Street, Dartmouth, and we were hooked. “We loved Dartmouth and still do,” she said. A premises found, it was time to take the plunge. Caroline bagged a teaching job at Dartmouth Secondary School to bring in an income while the gallery found its feet, and the intrepid pair set themselves a five-year deadline to make the business work. “When we eventually opened on April 13th 1981 we received


a mixed reception,” Caroline recalled. “Two local shopkeepers, I can’t remember their names now,


told us that we wouldn’t last a season. “It gave us a proper incentive to make a go of it!” Caroline continued: “We gave ourselves five years to sink or


swim. “At first I taught at the local comprehensive in order to give the gallery breathing space to start to make a profit – and it took three years to do that. “We felt lucky.” Add Simon’s hugely popular and imaginative images,


Caroline’s business acumen plus a great venue into the mix and you have a winning recipe which has produced the longest serving shop in Foss Street. From humble beginnings – the gallery sold just one postcard on its first day – the business has boomed and flourished to the extent that dozens of other shops across the UK now also stock Simon Drew cards, prints, mugs, table mats, tea towels and books. And his offbeat artworks are exhibited in one of London’s most popular commercial art galleries, the Chris Beetles Gallery in St James’s; and have made their way into his own books of illustrated verse, of which he has published more than 27. Ever the keen punster and humourist, who describes himself


as “half artist, half wit,” it is Simon’s sharp sense of the absurd that leads him to create his popular incongruous images. Working mainly in pen and ink with an emphasis on everyday


objects, birds and animals, Simon’s fine artwork has always been based on his penchant for playing with words. A trained zoologist, much of his work features wildlife and,


while remaining faithful to the basic anatomy of the animal, each is shown in an unusual environment or with bizarre accoutrements. But he tries not to resort to simple caricature. “People sometimes refer to them as cartoons but it’s


important to me that they aren’t just gags, that they have something interesting artistically for me to challenge myself with,” Simon said. Puns and cryptic language have provided Simon with


inspiration and his illustrations, nonsense verses and unusual pictures contain an offbeat quirkiness which he says may have been inspired by some of his artistic, literary, comedic and musical heroes. The works of Francis Bacon, Paul Klee, Mervyn Peake, Bonzo


Dog Band, Ogden Nash, Tom Lehrer, Brian Patten, Victoria Wood and others jostle for space among his collections. In 1991, exactly 10 years after opening the Simon Drew Gallery, the couple opened a second shop in Foss Street called Plugprints.


Foss Street in the 1990’s


Some images of the shop in the very early days (2 from the 1980’s and 2 from the 1990’s). “Foss Street was at its height of beauty in so far as street flowers are concerned. This is something that both Simon and Caroline have tried to champion.


Foss Street in the 1990’s Foss Street 1980


Foss Street circa 1986


“Being in Foss Street has also been a pleasure – it has a sense of community and camaraderie”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108