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51 Sponsored by Dartmouth Community Bookshop Book Review HERE COMES THE SUN!


those cockles. First up is the latest and much awaited book by Kazuo Ishiguro - Klara and the Sun (Faber & Faber).


W


armth is what we all need at the moment so whether you are outside or in your armchair here are a few books to warm


Crafting has had an upsurge over lockdown and these ‘unprecedented times’ seem to have heightened our awareness of the world around us. Patchwork – A life Amongst Clothes by ClaireWilcox was a book that caught my eye before Christmas as a wonderful present for anyone with a love for textiles, history


by Emma Jones


As he is a Nobel prize winning author I feel somewhat under-qualified to comment on the book. It is an intriguing story of a robot – aka Klara, the Artificial Friend - looking for a human owner with the book exploring the fundamental question of what does it mean to love? Suffice to say the reviews are all in agreement calling it a “masterpiece”, “beautiful”, “flawless” and “devastating.” That said, I’m holding it to one side until I find that special moment to ensure I get the full benefit of Ishiguro’s talent. I’m always on the hunt for a book with a really good page-turning story, a bit of history, interesting characters, a unique writing style and perhaps a foreign setting. Well look no further as Isabel Allende’s latest – A Long Petal of the Sea – has just come out in paperback (Bloomsbury Publishing) and it seems this will suit Allende fans as well as those of us who are new to her writing. The book (translated from the original Spanish version) follows the story of Victor Dalmau, a young doctor caught up in the Spanish Civil War who flees Barcelona with his sister- in-law Roser, aboard a ship bound for Chile. The book tells the decades-spanning human tale of war, exile and belonging set against a historical backdrop of real events including World War II and the fall of Pinochet. The rich web of characters come together in love and tragedy in a book “full of ambition and humanity.” Sunday Times.


and the importance of small things. The author pulls together this patchwork of memories in a stream of chapters using her skills and knowledge as a curator of fashion at the Victoria & Albert Museum. Presented almost like an exhibition, she stitches together the fabric of her own life with the memories of personal items such as a box of buttons, a pin in a hem or patterns on a kimono. It is beautifully written and “is a unique memoir told in rich, tantalising fragments that made me look at what we all wear with new interest and respect” – Tracy Chevalier The bright colours on the cover of Never Ending Summer (Arrow) by Emma Kennedy are a clue to this novel described as “the joyful escape we all need”. The story follows the adventure of three women and two unforgettable road trips. This is a voyage of self-discovery showing it’s never too late to discover a world of possibilities whatever your age. Described as “funny, warm and thoughtful” the author clearly has a skilful way with words and is an established writer with a number of books under her belt including her hilarious memoir of disastrous family holidays – The Tent, The Bucket and Me. She’s also been a Guardian columnist, created radio shows and a number of children’s TV programmes including the inimitable Dangermouse. This is quite simply “a joyous book” (Ruth Jones) and perfect on the beach, in the garden or on a plane (well … maybe).


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