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Company focused on tackling shoreline plastic pollution and restoring wild habitats for the benefit of all. Set up in 2016 specifically to


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access the places that regular beach cleans cannot reach, and to promote active, outdoor lifestyle, the social enterprise now operates two boats and a fleet of recycled kayaks along the South Devon Coast between Torbay and Plymouth. Since that time, an estimated seven


to eight tonnes of plastic and other pollution has been removed from the coast and estuary shorelines locally and a real positive contribution has been made by all involved. The intricate coastline and


estuaries of the area present a real logistical challenge to the clean up efforts and accessing them from the water has proven to be the way forward. Small teams of adventurous


volunteers regularly get out on the recycled kayaks affectionately known as ‘Sea Wombles’ to tackle known hot spots, or in reaction to reports of washed up derelict


fishing gear; it is not unusual, for the special ‘landing craft’ work boat to return with three or four hundred kilos onboard. Currently, there is an estimated


five tonnes of recovered material at the yard due for sorting and as the lockdown restrictions relent, the hope is that much of what has been recovered can be up-cycled and recycled, with the remainder going to waste to energy production.


...get out there, fall in love with nature, and protect what you love”


Looking towards the future,


founder Gary Jolliffe plans to continue to establish good working relationships with coastal land owners like the National Trust and other stakeholders to help facilitate the recovery of polluting flotsam and jetsam as quickly as possible to prevent it being buried by cliff falls or washed back out to sea. To that end, bags or containers


have been positioned at several coastal locations close to the Dart Estuary, including secluded coves like Newfoundland and Pudcombe,


To report plastic pollution please call 07817 910115 • Email - gary@tillthecoastisclear.co.uk


ill the Coast is Clear is a South Devon based Community Interest


Beaches like Scabbacombe and Man Sands and several other special spots so that those that venture there can help with the clean up efforts, without having to actually take away the large quantities that accumulate. Gary Jolliffe said “we are


all increasingly aware of the devastating effects of marine plastic pollution, and whilst the problem is daunting, we can all definitely make a positive impact by taking responsibility for what we can and being proactive and vociferous around the issues. The best thing to do though is to just get out there, fall in love with nature, and protect what you love”. Till the Coast is Clear would


like to thank all of the amazing volunteers who have helped on clean up missions over the years and the project’s brilliant sponsors and supporters; The Devon Environment Foundation, Rockfish, Coastal Recycling, CoGen, Nkuku, The Soar Mill Cove Hotel, Darthaven Marina, Blackness Marine and Tonto Marine.


To find out more please visit www.tillthecoastisclear.co.uk


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