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36


Caroline said: “We opened it to launch another strand of our business – we started producing t-shirts with Simon’s designs on. “We ran the shop for 25 years and only closed it because we


were run ragged expanding the wholesale side of our business and taking on a warehouse/ workshop at the top of town in Admiral’s Court.” The global Covid-19 pandemic hit the Simon Drew Gallery just as hard as it has countless small businesses across the country, but despite the setbacks the positive pair say they feel as lucky as they ever have. Caroline said: “We both work full time in the business now and have employed many wonderful, creative staff. “For instance, Sue Kendall has worked here


for 35 years and Abi Norris for almost 20. “We’ll be sad to see Kate Johnston, who has


spent nine years here, leave to live abroad this year. “It’s an excellent team and they have many


skills. Again, we’ve been lucky.” Simon and Caroline also have a love of beautiful ceramics and consider themselves lucky, again, to be able to sell the work of Colin Kellam, Ross Emerson, Maureen Minchin, Jennie Hale, Elaine Peto, John Pollex, Mark Dally and many more. It may be considered ill-fated by some, but the number 13 has been an auspicious one for the Drews right from the start.


Caroline explained: “The number 13 has


always brought good luck to us – our gallery is number 13, we opened on the 13th, and we have a workshop at the top of town where we deliberately applied for unit 13. Simon and Caroline are confident that they and other local shops will emerge stronger and more successful from the unprecedented year of Covid-19. She continued: “Having made


art and humour into a business, we see no reason to stop now. “Another way in which we feel


fortunate is that we still enjoy the work. “Being in Foss Street has also been a pleasure – it has a sense of community and camaraderie. “We’re confident that


Dartmouth will thrive and that independent shops will rise again after the pandemic. We’re not sinking, but swimming.


“The first 40 years have been terrific and


it’ll get better.” Caroline laughed: “We didn’t have a clue about business when we started, but we reckon we’re getting the hang of it now.”•


NEW EXHIBITION AT SIMON DREW GALLERY


J


ohn Pollex is one of Britain`s foremost potters collected


JOHN POLLEX


Slipware for the Roaring 20’s 28th May to 16th June


SIMON DREW GALLERY Foss Street, Dartmouth www.simondrew.co.uk


by important ceramic collectors internationally. His work is highly coloured although he is working in the traditional slipware methods for which Devon is well known. This gallery has shown his work for more than 30 years and this exhibition shows the ever- evolving style of John Pollex`s work. His first exhibition here was in 1988. He is a great admirer of Howard Hodgkin, Patrick Heron and Ben Nicholson and references can be seen in many pots. The exhibition is open from Friday 28th of May from 10am till 7pm though we are unable to have a full open evening due to current restrictions. Numbers will be limited at any one time. 13 Foss Street, Dartmouth 01803 832832 www.simondrew.co.uk


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