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19 Wildlife & Nature Events


Edible flowers Colours abound and there are plenty of wild flowers to


liven up a cup, cake or quiche be it a violet, primrose or forget-me-not. They may well be in vogue now but flowers have long been used to embellish and flavour favourite foods. Ancient Greeks used violet petals in their wine and the Ottomans used roses for the much loved Turkish Delight.


Nature’s Larder Borage - Herb with a distinctive blue flower and cucumber like scent and flavour which makes it perfect in cocktails and, of course, Pimms.


Hawthorn -The young leaves, flower buds and young flowers are all edible and can be added to green salads and grated root salad. The white flowers have a subtle almond smell.


Elderflower - The blousey blossoms are almost upon us. Timing is key when picking these blooms which are ideal for making a batch of elderflower cordial or even frozen elderflower margaritas.


Sweet Cicely - this fern-like plant with white flowers is a member of the carrot family. It is a natural sweetener and the leaves can be widely used in vegetable and fruit salads, soups and stew.


Look out for…. One of South Devon’s


incredible insects - Six- banded nomad cuckoo bee – rarest bee in the UK, found in just one spot in the S.Devon AONB on the cliffs at Prawle Point. To find out more visit naturaldevon.org. uk and buglife.org.uk


11 May The History of orchards and cider making in South Devon Join Robin Toogood, chair of Orchard Link, for this free online talk. Robin will take you on a journey through time looking at the importance of orchards and cider making to our landscape and communities. Booking essential. 7- 8pm. enquiries@southdevonaonb.org.uk


20 May Dusk Wildlife walk around Chivelstone 7 – 8pm Join Adam Davison, South Devon AONB Project Officer, for an evening walk around some of the paths and green lanes of Chivelstone. Catch the birds as they settle down for the day and the bats coming out for the night.The walk is being run in partnership with the Chivelstone Church restoration and community project. Free event, booking essential. enquiries@southdevonaonb.org.uk


27 May & 24 June


What happened/happens in this old green lane?


Allaleigh Lane, Cornworthy Join Valerie Belsey, author of books on Devonshire’s green lanes, and take a slow walk up and down one of the longest lanes in the South Hams. Sailors, millers, woodsmen, paper makers, nuns came here and many more. There are buzzards, ravens, dippers here, some rare trees and flowers and mammals. Contact valeriebelsey@gmail.com or 0786608369. £5. Booking essential – 5 walkers max.


13 June Forage for Food - Summer Sharpham Estate Spend a day in the breathtaking grounds of Sharpham Estate with Brigit-Anna McNeill, learning to identify, pick safely and prepare seasonal wild foods. sharphamtrust.org Tel: 01803 732542


27 June


LEAF Open Farm Sunday Discover the world of farming –Vis it a farm on LEAF Find out about the sto ry behind our food and how farm ing affects our every day lives. Each LEAF Open Farm Sun day event is unique. Activ i ties range from machin ery dis plays, trac tor and trail er rides, through to demon stra tions, nature walks and much more! check website for participating local farms. Farmsunday.org


Bee Pic: Geograph-3497630-by-Peter-Pearson


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