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Charity hits appeal target and welcomes new and existing members!


Thanks to the most amazing support from the local community and people and organisations from further afield, charity Dart Sailability is delighted to announce that it has reached its £25,000 relocation target in just three weeks.


Principal Ian Wakeling says: “We


are absolutely astounded at people’s generosity and can’t thank them enough. The support the charity has received from individuals, trusts and community groups is staggering. We are truly grateful.”


The charity enables people with any


type of disability to enjoy sailing and power boating on the River Dart together with a wide range of social activities. It is now looking forward to welcoming new and existing members for the start of the season in May. The charity’s new home is at Dartside Quay at Galmpton and members will benefit from regular sailing and social activities. Group memberships are available for organisations supporting those with disabilities. All members can gain valuable Royal Yachting Association qualifications appropriate to their abilities.


Aquatic adventures include the use of a


variety of boats as passenger or crew and also taking control of vessels, participating in races, wildlife and heritage cruises up the River Dart, picnics, cream teas and the famous Sausage Sizzle on the beach with singing around the campfire optional! Dartmouth Regatta is a popular event for sailing and fancy dress with an annual barbeque on the lovely terraces of the Royal Dart Yacht Club a summer highlight. The busy social calendar continues with barn dances, quizzes, skittles, a prize giving ceremony and dinner, Christmas lunch and other fun events.


Ian says: “We’re really looking forward


to welcoming existing and new members and for the first time we have our own clubhouse which I’m sure will be put to good use. Absolutely no sailing experience is necessary and we have a wide range of boats suitable for people with a range of disabilities.”


To find out more please go to www.dartsailabiilty.org Ian Wakeling, Principal, Dart Sailability


Abi by her dad Chris “Aged 27, Abi is quadriplegic, suffers from cerebral palsy, epilepsy and has little or no sight. Despite these considerable challenges, she has amazing ability and loves to be involved with everything going on. Sailing mornings are eagerly anticipated and her excitement is quite something to witness. The sailing allows Abi the freedom to feel the water and wind on her face, the sensation of waves and wakes hitting the boat. Her lovely smile shows her excitement and she gets very animated when the cadets from Dartmouth Royal Naval College are around! Abi particularly enjoys being afloat on the ARC – the charity’s Farries Flyer landing craft.” Abi is very happy and listens to everything going on around her and we are absolutely convinced that she understands far more than she is given credit for. We can’t thank Dart Sailability enough for what they do for Abi and they go the extra mile to ensure everybody has a great time. Thank you.”


Steve I was a highly experienced seaman, having served in the Royal Navy. A disability left me believing I could never enjoy the water again. However, I knew about Sailability, and decided to join. I love it. Sailors enjoy getting out of their chair, their prison. When a person is in a wheelchair they are always looking up, so they are rarely eye-to-eye with someone else. But the nature of sailing changes that and makes engagement with other people more comfortable. It’s also a joy to see the wildlife - fish come to the surface, and seals sit and watch.


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