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21 metres, the new marina includes a pontoon for craft from 15 to 18 metres - and with up to 20m below the waterline, these bigger berths are proving popular. Following the completion of critical enabling works


to provide improved and safer access into Noss, more parking and a primary electricity substation, work on shore has focussed on building new sea defences and a new boatyard facility. Scheduled for completion by the end of the year, the new boatyard facility will include a hoist dock, hard standing for boat storage, a dry stack and a dry stack dock. For launch and recovery the yard will be equipped with a new Marine Forklift to serve the dry stack and a new 75 tonne hoist for boat lifts – the largest on the river. The hoist is scheduled for delivery this summer and once in operation will service craft moored from the Dart and along the South Devon coast. With deep water access and a 75 tonne lifting capacity, the new boatyard is expected to be of particular interest to owners of larger private boats and commercial vessels - including local fishing fleets. New boat storage areas will support the yard’s activities by providing hard standing for up to 100 boats and a self-store facility will be provided for boat-kit storage. The marina’s 120 berth dry stack is already under


construction and will complete later in the year. Offering seasonal and annual contracts, this dry stack berthing will attract smaller powered craft up to 10m.


The construction of a new Marina Control building starts this spring and together with provision for marina administration, its attractive low impact design includes luxury berth holder facilities, a launderette and a small cafe with completion expected early in 2022. Meanwhile, local construction company Devon


Aiming to create something very special for all to enjoy


Contractor Limited, is working hard on the development of the marina’s new commercial buildings which besides housing an array of marine trades and small businesses, will also provide a home for the South Devon College’s Marine Academy. Planned to finish in late summer, the exterior of these buildings is now largely complete. In line with Premier’s aim to create a marine centre of excellence, a mix of marine trades have already expressed interest in becoming tenants.


Premier’s overall vision for this area is to generate a


vibrant commercial community where businesses are provided with purpose-built workshops and offices and boat owners can find all the services they need on site - from yard services and marine repairs through to boat sales. Also under construction and aiming for a 2021 finish is a decked car park that’s been thoughtfully designed to blend into the topography of the site. With 195 spaces, this car park will serve visitors and berth holders and will form a significant part of the site’s parking plan. The construction of a boutique hotel, spa and restaurant complex is due to begin in early 2022. Aiming to create something very special for all to


enjoy, Premier’s plans for Noss on Dart Marina include a passenger ferry link to Dartmouth town with free landing. Premier is grateful to the various stakeholders that have supported the acquisition of Noss on Dart and looks forward to it being a place that will bring visitors, employment and investment opportunities into the area. Premier Marinas is owned by the Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation that exists to improve health for everyone. Including Noss on Dart, Premier owns and operates nine prestigious marinas – all South Coast based. To find out more visit premiermarinas.com.


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