search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INFORMATION


Seven steps to managing change in the workplace


By Dr Mike Talbot, Chief Executive and founder of UK Mediation


Change is an inevitable and positive feature of any successful workplace, but even the most positive change can risk causing workplace conflict. Working as a mediator for over


20 years has shown me that people are creatures of habit: we prefer our working lives relatively unchanging and predictable. We like to know what our jobs are, who we report to, and where we’re heading professionally; change in the workplace can often leave one or more of these factors in doubt. How can managers prepare for


conflict when implementing changes in the workplace, and what should they do when conflict occurs?


1 – Make sure workers feel heard and valued While this is already an important part of management, it is crucial when implementing change. Managers need to not only make it clear they are happy to listen to


concerns, but also actively seek out opinions of those who will feel the impact. Engaged listening should continue throughout the process.


2 – Understand how change impacts workers Even changes that seem simple can have unintended side effects on workers. Managers must consider all possible consequences of changes they make so they can pre-empt this. An example I frequently come across is conflict arising due to hiring new staff. The need for new staff to take on an increased workload may seem a no-brainer. However, it can bring complications, as adding new people brings a new set of personalities into the workplace. As well as potential personality clashes, issues can arise from a confusion of roles. It’s important both new and existing employees are clear on their roles, who they report to, and what the expectations for them are.


3 – Be ready for conflict anyway Even if you do everything right in preparing for change, you can’t stop conflict occurring. Conflict isn’t necessarily unhealthy - however, when dealt with poorly or not at all, conflict can be costly and damaging. For example, 30% of UK employees admitted to missing work to avoid conflict. It’s in the manager’s interest to address conflict as soon as it occurs – expecting it to resolve itself could cost time, money and staff.


4 – Consider seeking external help Seeking help from someone outside the department - or even an impartial workplace mediator - can be an essential step for resolving conflict effectively. Mediators turn resistance between parties into collaboration, using techniques to come to a mutually beneficial agreement. Someone outside the immediate environment has a degree of impartiality an internal manager won’t have.


5 – Have a productive conversation Once you’ve identified conflict, address it with a productive conversation. This starts with giving each person a chance to voice their concerns. This must take place in a non-judgmental, impartial, and empathic environment.


6 – Plan for the future Ensure similar issues don’t arise in the future. A great way to do this is to agree a set of SMART goals around what people say and do, making sure the goals are behaviour focused and arrived at fairly. After these have been set, follow up after a few weeks to assess how things are going.


7 – Learn from the experience It is important to view each conflict as an opportunity for learning. I would advise managers to take time to reflect. Ask what it says about your workplace as a whole and what steps you should take to avoid similar problems in the future.


Choose your preferred meals from a variety of options and place your order securely online. The food is freshly cooked, chilled and delivered to your door.


All meals can be warmed up in the microwave direct from the freezer, so no time wasted with pots and pans, waiting for deliveries or cooking for yourself.


Meals are packed conveniently in microwavable tubs, so no need for plates if you want to avoid washing up as well.


Dining brings the flavours of the world to your dinner table, including Italian, Arabic, European and Indian, using the freshest of ingredients.


business network April 2020 93


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96