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ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:FEBRUARY/MARCH


FREE WEEKEND AND VOLUNTEERING OPPORTUNITIES AT


WORDSWORTH HOUSE! WORDSWORTH HOUSE AND GARDEN


TASTE OF THE PAST


Wordsworth House and Garden is marking the opening of its special exhibition celebrating 250 years since William’s birth, with a free entry weekend on 14th and 15th March.


‘The Child is Father of the Man’ reveals how the boy who grew up to be one of the world’s best-loved nature poets was shaped by his wild, outdoor upbringing in Cockermouth and the trauma that all- too-soon shattered this happy existence.


Zoe Gilbert, Wordsworth House and Garden’s visitor experience manager, said: “William’s ideas are as relevant today as they were two centuries ago. Before he put pen to paper, most people saw the natural world as either a source of food, or a hostile wilderness.


“The poetry he wrote, supported by his sister Dorothy, reframed it as a place of wonder and refreshment for everyone to enjoy, ideas that led directly to the creation of the National Trust and the birth of the global conservation movement.”


She added: “To qualify for free entry on Saturday 14th or Sunday 15th March, all we ask is that visitors tell us how they heard about this offer.”


‘The Child is Father of the Man’ features objects ranging from William’s ice skates, tinted spectacles and highly decorated inkwell, to Dorothy’s baby bonnet.


Alongside insights from renowned Wordsworth expert Kathleen Jones and award-winning poet Helen Mort, specially commissioned photographs by Simon Mooney focus on the ephemeral nature of childhood objects and what their loss or preservation means to us today.


Dorothy’s tiny bonnet, which was painstakingly hand-sewn – most likely by their mother Ann – in anticipation of Dorothy’s birth on Christmas Day 1771, is the sole item to remain from the siblings’ childhood, making it especially precious and evocative.


Wordsworth House and Garden is looking to recruit new volunteers to chat to visitors, act as tour guides and help in the refreshment area.


Zoe said: “Our volunteers play a key part in making Wordsworth House and Garden such a vibrant, welcoming place. We’re looking for people with a warm, friendly manner and you don’t need any special knowledge or abilities, as we provide full training and support.”


If you would like to find out more, pop in for coffee and a chat between 10.00am and 1.00pm on Friday 20th March, or email rachel.painter@nationaltrust.org.uk.


‘The Child is Father of the Man’ is open from Saturday to Thursday, 11.00am - 4.00pm, until 8th November.


Photograph: An illustration from Gulliver’s Travels, one of William’s favourite books when he was a boy. Credit: University of Glasgow


WWW.COCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


Start a new conversation at Wordsworth House & Garden


Interested in becoming a National Trust volunteer? Drop in for coffee and a chat10am-1pm, Friday 20 March


nationaltrust.org.uk/wordsworth-house oca con y u u ui i i .


i u u .


COCKERMOUTH SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE CLUB


Scottish Dancers are not usually associated with Pole Dancing but that is what a group of us were doing recently! A team of Scottish Dancers were the first item on the programme for the residents of the Fairways Care Home in Workington, when they were celebrating Burns’ Night. The room they were dancing in, has two central poles which have to be negotiated, so the story is not what you first thought of, when you started to read my article!


The photograph shows the dance team with a few of the residents who were very appreciative of our efforts. We followed a programme of reel, jig and strathspey, plus a ceilidh dance to allow for some of the audience to join in.


We are often asked to go to groups, schools and care homes to entertain and to let people know what Scottish Dancing is about. It is not really a spectator sport, but we can deliver a varied programme, which allows for an appreciation of what is involved, plus lively music and the opportunity to try some easy moves.


Our club is a lively one, we have a good number of dancers at each class who enjoy keeping both body and mind fit.


Marlene runs a class at the village hall in Bassenthwaite on Monday evenings - 017687 76054


Gail teaches youngsters from age 7 on Mondays after school in the hall on Lorton Street, Cockermouth - cockermouthyouthscd@talktalk.net


Angela holds her class on Thursday evenings, also at Lorton Street - 016973 20082


If you would like to know more, you can contact the Secretary, Marion on 01900 817045.


www.derwentscd.com www.rscdscarlisle.co.uk


Marion Monckton ISSUE 439 | 27 FEBRUARY 2020 | 39


© National Trust 2019. Registered Charity no. 205846. Photography © National Trust Images/Paul Harris


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