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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 33 YEARS SPRING: THE OPENING ACT


With nights still short and the ground still heavily frosted it is hard to believe that we are almost back round to spring. However, while it may be hard to ignore the bleak rainy days, or the snow covered fells, there are clear signs that the show is beginning. Snowdrops, primroses and wood anemones are among the early bloomers, those species that endure the elements to give us a preview of what is yet to come.


Snowdrops can be seen between January and late February. Emerging through frozen soil, their drooping white flowers nod atop slender stems. Growing in clumps, with narrow green-grey leaves, their bright white petals are the perfect antidote to the solid ground and bare flora of winter. They are found almost anywhere - grasslands, wetlands, woodlands, even in towns and gardens. Although not native, being first recorded in the late 18th century, they have a long history, growing in swathes across the country.


KATIE DOUGLASS


Primroses can be seen between December (if mild) and May. Its common name comes from the Latin 'prima rosa', meaning 'first rose' and describing its early spring flowering. They are hardy little plants that grow in clusters and despite preferring woodland clearings, they are also commonly seen along hedgerows and in grassland. They have rough tongue-like leaves and large creamy yellow flowers that are the perfect reminder of a warm summer’s day.


Even


Wood anemones can be seen between March and May. They grow in the dappled shade of ancient woodlands, flowering before the canopies under which they grow become too dense. They have deeply lobed leaves and a thin red stem, the delicate flower is made up of 6-7 large white, or sometimes purple streaked, petals. The seeds of this dainty bloom are mostly infertile, with the plant spreading slowly through the growth of its roots.


though it’s chilly out, a few


wildflowers are braving the cold to let us know that spring is coming and the main act is nearly here. So, why not also brave the weather and enjoy them whilst they bloom.


Photograph: Wood Anemone Laura Preston


WHAT DOES THE MODERN ZOO OR WILDLIFE PARK DO? KEEPER NOTES FROM THE WILDLIFE PARK


The British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums (BIAZA) is the professional body that represents Zoos, Wildlife Parks, Safari Parks and Aquariums in the UK and Ireland. Modern Zoos offer so much more than a collection of animals for the public to visit. The Lake District Wildlife Park, a BIAZA member contributes to conservation and research, with the welfare of animals at its heart. The Park is also dedicated to educating and inspiring visitors to help protect animals and their habitats in the wild.


healthy and genetically viable populations of animals in captivity.


programmes. Three conservation charities are supported by the Lake District Wildlife Park: SEED Madagascar for Lemur conservation, the International Vulture Programme and the Red Panda Network.


Fishing Cat


EAZA takes the breeding programmes a step further by actively aiding in the protection of natural habitats and working with local people to educate and look at alternative ways of earning an income. This encourages a more sustainable and wildlife friendly way of living.


Lemurs


BIAZA is a member the European Association of Zoos and Aquariums (EAZA). By working together, European Wildlife parks and Zoos play a major role in looking at the bigger picture of conservation. The European Endangered Species Programme (EEP), the European Studbook (ESB) and the Regional Collection Plan (RCP) work in collaboration maintain


INFO@COCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


The Lake District Wildlife Park staff work hard to protect wildlife both at home and overseas. The natural habitat on the surrounding Armathwaite Hall Estate is managed with the conservation of native wildlife in mind. The Park is also involved in two European Breeding Programmes: Fishing Cats and Red Pandas. Other species including Red Ruffed Lemurs, Tapirs, Lar Gibbons, Mandrills and Black Wildebeest are all included in ESB breeding


Red Panda


Over the next few months, we will talk a bit more about breeding programmes, conservation and the species that are involved in this. Alternatively, if you would like any more information about what we do, come and see us and speak to one of our friendly Keepers.


Richard Robinson, Park Manager and the Team Find out more at


www.lakedistrictwildlifepark.com 017687 76239


ISSUE 439 | 27 FEBRUARY 2020 | 28


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