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KEEPING YOU IN TOUCH - YOUR FREE MONTHLY NEWSPAPER DELIVERED DOOR-TO-DOOR FOR 33 YEARS Inner Spirit Therapies


Angelic Reiki SPRING 2020 OFFER


First 30 minutes of 1st treatment FREE 07939 848 664


www.innerspirittherapies.com


If you get up early at the moment, around 5.00am, and see the sky is clear (don't laugh, clear skies aren't absolutely impossible in Cumbria, they're just as rare


reaching a


as a Love Island the


final


Mastermind) look to the south-east and you will see


reasonably-


LIZ HUNTER PHYSIOTHERAPY LTD


We have a team of four physiotherapists and a sports and


remedial massage therapist offering appointments Monday to Saturday including some evenings. We also offer a wide range of exercise classes suitable for all ages and abilities, to maintain and improve strength and flexibility.


For any information please contact us on: 01900 822008 or visit www.lizhunterphysio.co.uk Lorton Street Clinic, Lorton Street, Cockermouth, CA13 9RH


BEAUTY AT HOME WITH HAILEE


Mobile beautician, enjoy beauty treatments in the comfort of your own home by a fully qualified beauty technician. Specialising in CND shellac, many colours and glitters of your choice.


DERMAPLANING NOW AVAILABLE


A safe and effective manual exfoliation procedure leaving the skin visibly smoother with an instant glow.


TEL: 07957 261739 • FB: @haileebellx


bright orange star shining just above the trees. Give it another hour and if


the just sky brighter in clearing aren't is


still clear you'll see a


colour. star the


horizon to its lower left too, more yellow - white ‘stars’


actually These stars,


they're planets. The creamy-coloured one is Saturn, the reddish one, you won't be surprised to hear, is Mars. It's easily visible to the naked eye now but come the autumn, it will be a much more impressive sight - high in the sky and a lot brighter than it is now. I can't wait. I'll be looking at it through my telescope every chance I get.


But as excited as I'll be to gaze across the gulf of space and marvel at the sight of the Red Planet's shining ice caps, dark dust deserts and vast orange plains, I'll feel a lot of frustration and disappointment too. Because instead of looking at its shimmering disc through a telescope, I should be looking at video footage of astronauts bouncing happily across its surface, kicking up clouds of cinnamon- hued dust with their big white boots. It's 2020, for pity's sake! We should have been on Mars years ago.


DOUBLE GLAZING


REPAIR SPECIALIST with over 30 years experience


Locks, Handles, Hinges, Units All at Competitive Rates


Call Ben on: 01900 826572 Mobile: 07522 981 106


INFO@COCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


In a way, we have been ‘on Mars’ since 1976 when NASA's twin Viking probes landed. Since then, many different probes have landed on that distant world. Some stayed where they landed, to carry out detailed experiments in one specific location, others set off across across Barsoom's desolate but beautiful rocky landscape like R2-D2 trundling across the deserts of Tatooine. These Mars rovers, little robot buggies, half scientist, half sightseer, have travelled for dozens of kilometres across Mars and have genuinely revolutionised our understanding of that faraway world. But as amazing as they are - and no-one is a bigger Mars rover fan


contestant of


LETTER FROM THE


SOUTH...


than me - compared to a human being, they are very limited in their capabilities. When they're not getting stuck in a dust dune or waiting for their computers to reboot, they move sooooo slowly and can do so little, that they are as frustrating


as fantastic. somewhere they I that are


read a


human astronaut on Mars could do in an hour what a rover can do in a day.


Of course, it is a lot harder


and expensive hasn't to done


people to Mars than robots, which is why it been


Robots just need power - from sunlight or a nuclear reactor - but


people need a lot more. They need food and water, air to breathe, a place to live and work inside, protected from the clogging dust, harmful radiation and freezing temperatures of Mars. And they need a way to come home.


Growing up as a space-mad kid, hiding at breaktimes in the library at St. Joseph's school, devouring books about the stars and planets behind a curtain, I was told - no, I was promised - that people would fly to Mars not long after the Apollo missions finished. Mounting my cards in my treasured Brooke Bond ‘The Space Age’ booklet, I was assured that not just one, but two huge nuclear-powered spaceships would set off for Mars in 1986. In the 90s, Maggie Philbin looked me in the eye through my TV and told me that space technology was progressing so fast that when I grew up, I would be able to go to Mars.


Well, Maggie ‘Pants on Fire’ Philbin told me a fib. I'm not on Mars, and no-one else is. Mars is still the only planet in the solar system inhabited exclusively by robots. So, when Mars is shining bright in the sky in October, I'll be thrilled, as I am every time I see it. But I'll be sad too! Because at this rate I'll be in my 70s when the first crewed expedition lands on Mars and knowing my luck I'll nod off, or need to dash to the loo, just as the first boot-print is made in that crushed strawberry dust...


Stuart Atkinson ISSUE 439 | 27 FEBRUARY 2020 | 10


more send


yet.


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