search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
BY THE D AR T INTER VIE W


STEPHEN LEVY


Upbeat Dartmouth estate agent Stephen Levy has camped out at Charles and Diana’s wedding, lived in a Jewish commune, sailed up the Nile, taught in Greece and whipped up a storm on Channel 4’s Come Dine With Me. Born in New Zealand, the staunch royalist came to the UK 40 years ago because he thought London was the centre of the world! Steph Woolvin pinned him down for a chat...


S


tephen wasn’t sure what he wanted to do when he was young, he was too busy going yachting and riding horses. He grew up near the coast


about 15 miles from Wellington, New Zealand. “I had a great childhood with my two brothers allways getting up to mischief. I loved New Zealand but I always had a desire to travel to England. I think I saw it as my ‘spiritual home’, you know, ‘mother England’. My grandparents were British and I was passionate about all things British; the monarchy, the country’s rich history and all the pomp and circumstance.” Whilst in his late teens he helped out at a school in Fiji, this gave him the idea that he might like to be a teacher so he decided to ‘be sensible’ and do a teaching course.


But it wasn’t long before his itchy


of the world where the British Royal family live.’ It was like a dream.” He explored the city for a couple of weeks before heading down to the South West to pay Mrs Roberts a visit.


Stephen said when he arrived in Dartmouth he was “Because I had


feet got the better of him and, at the age of 23 in 1977, he booked a one way boat trip to England for a thousand dollars. “I boarded the ship in Auckland with all my bags, a bit of money and a lot of enthusiasm. We stopped off at a few countries including Panama.” He said going through the Panama Canal was a truly memorable experience - a highlight was watching crocodiles swimming about in the locks. On board he met a lady from Dartmouth on holiday with her mum. The lady, Mrs Roberts, invited Stephen to visit her when they got to England. Stephen took her details but couldn’t really think past the main event - London. “When I walked out of the station and saw Big Ben I really thought ‘I’ve arrived - I’m in the capital


experience with horses they put me in charge of teaching people how to ride and called me ‘master of the horse’. I won’t lie - I loved it!”


bowled over by its beauty. Growing up near the water he instantly felt at home here. He enjoyed exploring the town, but London was calling again, so he soon headed back to the big smoke and got a job in a lighting shop on Baker Street. He earned £30 a week (this was 1977) but his little bedsit in Kensington cost £15 so he’s not sure how he managed to survive on what was left. He loved being amongst the bright lights but says his heart was torn as he wanted to return to Dartmouth. “After a year or so I asked if, by chance, Mrs Roberts needed a lodger. She said yes and I immediately moved in and got a job working at an antiques and furniture business called The Jolly Peddler’s in the Market Square. I would drive the boss’s van around doing house clearances, he would export the good stuff and I would sell the rest on my own market stall - it


was a hoot!” Stephen went on ping ponging between London and Dartmouth for a few years and whilst decid- ing where to settle he managed to fit in a few overseas adventures. “I went to Greece to teach English. You had to go into school early, have a break during the hottest part of the day and then continue later on. I remember spending Christmas with some ex-pats, I was in charge of brandy butter. We didn’t have an oven so we took the


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116