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fallen out of bed - we have a good chat and make sure we leave them happy and comfortable.” Donna says they’re rarely sent to nightlife related incidents like pub brawls as it’s not an issue in our area; they’re more likely to attend illness, road traffic accidents and water related incidents. “The ones I dread are anything to do with children. Little ones can com- pensate well for so long and then just drop, then it becomes a real emergency, at least with adults they usually go down hill steadily so it’s easier to keep track of the condition.” The ambulances themselves are like mini hospitals with defibrilla- tors, monitoring equipment and even kit for delivering a baby. “Sometimes, apart from the gener- al observations, there is little you can do until you get to hospital so you just sit with the patient on the journey and talk to them. A bit of kindness can go a long way - it’s often a much calmer person who comes out the back door to the one who went in.” Donna has found that people look to them with so much hope especially when they arrive at the scene: “You can see people relax the minute you get there. Especially the family or whoever is with the casualty. It’s such a relief for them. We see a


“It will just be a normal day for us, although we will probably put some Christmas tunes on in the ambulance to keep us jolly on the journeys back to the station!”


lot of frightened people - they’re calling you because they are at their lowest ebb.” Donna says most people are really polite but there has been the odd occasion when patients and families have got a little upset when she has to explain that they won’t be waiting for them outside the hospital to bring them home as they’ll be going straight to their next patient. The station is comfortable and well equipped with a kitchen, cosy chairs, and a big TV with plenty of DVDs for the rare quiet night. During ‘station time’ they clean and replenish the ambulance stocks of equipment and medicines and make their meals. Donna says they don’t often cook as they only get half hour breaks so it’s usually sandwiches or a microwave job. The team make sure there is al- ways a plentiful supply of snacks on the side to keep them all going and


even more during the festive period. Donna is happy to work on Christmas Day: “It will just be a normal day for us, although we will probably put some Christmas tunes on in the ambulance to keep us jolly on the journeys back to the station!” She says the message for us all this Christmas is to have fun but make sensible choices so hopefully the team won’t need to pay you a visit over the festive season.•


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