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27 WILDLIFE & NATURE EVENTS The winter months are the best time


for seeing starling murmurations. These mass flockings of thousands of birds are one of nature’s magical spectacles and are best viewed at dusk. It is believed this flight behaviour helps to protect the starlings from predators and the swirling effect is emphasised by the bird’s ability to make changes in their flight in a split second.


Do you have problems with birds flying into your windows/glass balcony


or balustrade ? Every year many birds die after flying into


windows, doors and glass deck balustrades. The trick is to reduce the appearance of the glass as a flight path. Consider fixing self-adhesive silhou- ettes images such as half-moons, stars etc to the outside of the glass. The


most effective shape is likely to be that of a hawk. Do you have an interest in the


wildlife of South Devon? Why not join The Kingsbridge Natural History Society which aims to promote interest in all aspects of natural history, particularly in the South Hams area. Everyone is welcome to their monthly wildlife talks held on the 3rd Monday of every month at 7.30pm from September to April in West Charleton Village Hall. The Society also facilitate walks to local areas of interest, sometimes with a local expert guide. Membership is £10 per annum, visitors are charged £4 - please just introduce yourself. For more information contact Chris Klee on 01548 288 397 or jcklee@pobroadband.co.uk or Membership Secretary Mike Hitch T: 01548 581442 or email mikejhitch@btinternet.com


Future talks include: Monday 16th December: AGM followed by “The History of the Avon Fishing Association” and changes in fish stocks Monday 27th January: “Conservation projects in the South Devon AONB” Monday 24th February: “Dartmoor wildlife and photography”


13 DECEMBER/17 JANUARY WINTER BIRD WALK Barn Owl Trust, Ashburton Join our Conservation Team for a walk around the Lennon Legacy Project land on the edge of wild Dartmoor, to see and hear the winter birds. 9.30am. Suggested donation per person: £8. Booking Essential. Barnowltrust.org


14/15 DECEMBER LOST LIVES – CITIZAN WINTER TRAIL Start Point – Slapton Sands A guided trail with CITiZAN maritime archaeologists will take you on a 2 hour guided trail across the sands at low tide with a warm up in the pub and a 2 hour hike back along the cliff tops. Free event. Pre-booking essential. For more informa- tion go to the CITiZAN website or contact gbettinson@mola. org.uk Meet at Start Point car park, Stokenham, TQ7 2ET


21 DECEMBER BEACH CLEAN Blackpool Sands 10 - 11am beach@blackpoolsands.co.uk


18 JANUARY


MEET A BARN OWL Slapton Ley Field Centre The Barn Owl Trust is coming to run a workshop to inspire us about everything barn owls. 10.30am - 12.30pm. DWT members £1 per child, non DWT members £2 per child, accompanying adults free. Email: Watch.sl@field-studies-council.org for more info and to book.


FEB 8 BEACH ROCKS Slapton Fancy learning more about why the pebbles at Slapton are all different colours? What’s their story and what makes the shingle ridge at Slapton so special? We will be building castles in the air, doing a little rock art and deepening our knowl- edge of the beach with facts to wow your friends with next time you’re there for a bbq or swim! DWT members £1 per child, non DWT members £2 per child, accompanying adults free. Email: Watch.sl@field-studies-council.org for more info and to book.


DWT = Devon Wildlife Trust


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