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400


DARTMOUTH MAYFLOWER


The launch of the Dartmouth Mayflower Heritage Trail took place on 19 November 2020. The Mayflower Dartmouth team have been working with Tom Leaper, a South West artist, who has created some wonderful bronze way markers to indicate the route. These are now in place around the town together with informa- tion boards such as the one at Bayards Cove.


Dartmouth is one of 11 Compact towns from the UK engaged in the Mayflower 400 project along with Leiden, Holland and Plymouth, US. For the full story visit our website www. dartmouthmayflower400.uk


MAYFLOWER HERITAGE TRAIL NEW TOUR


GUIDES The first of our new Tour Guides have completed their initial ‘training’ and will soon be available for organised tours. They are instantly recognisable with their new branded uniforms.





5. Brown’s Hill Steps In 1620 this was an important meeting point. Roads led from here up the steep hill to the parish church of St Clement’s and out of the town; west along the edge of the Mill Pool; east along the river’s edge to the shipyards of Hardness; and south into Clifton.


6. Foss Street Foss Street marks where the dam across the tidal creek used to be. John Roope, who owned the mill in 1619, wanted to stop people walking over the mill drawbridges. Maps drawn for the legal case clearly show the town’s appearance at the time of the Mayflower’s visit.


Nicholas Townsend’s map of Dartmouth in 1619


1.Visitor Centre The trail begins at the Visitor Centre, which stands on ground reclaimed from the river in the 19thC. In 1620, ships moored here. The nearby church commemorates John Flavel, a Puritan preacher and writer, well known in England and America in the 17thC.


2. The Quay and Fairfax Place To further develop Dartmouth’s trade, a new quay was built here between 1570 and 1640. New houses were built along it by leading members of the town. The house on the corner is a good example of a 17thC Devon town house.


3. The Butterwalk These merchants’ houses, now called the Butterwalk, were built between 1628 and 1640, on reclaimed land. They backed on to the river and ships came up to the back door. Today Dartmouth Museum occupies two of them.


4. The Old Market In 1620 this area was the Mill Pool, originally a tidal creek. A dam across the creek allowed the tide to be used to power a mill, which operated until around 1800. The Market was built in 1828 after the pool was drained.


The Cherub


9. Chapel Lane Up Chapel Lane is the old Baptist Meeting House (now a private house). There was a Baptist community in the town by 1646. Thomas Newcomen, inventor of the first successful working steam engine, was born in Dartmouth in 1664.He was a Baptist preacher.





7. St. Saviour’s Church The church of St Saviour was consecrated in 1372. It was built by the townspeople, who wanted a church in the centre of the town, and over the centuries they endowed it with many beautiful features. In 1620, refurbishment was underway; the porch was rebuilt that year.


8. Smith Street and Higher Street This was the heart of medieval Dartmouth. The pillory was located here with the stocks. In Higher Street here are two fine 17thC houses; further along is the Cherub, one of the oldest town houses in the southwest of England.


Free Trail Map leaflet At the same time, a free Trail Map leaflet is now available from e.g. the Dartmouth Visitor Centre detail- ing the location and history of each point of interest.


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