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44


CAPTAIN ROGER READWIN


COMMANDING OFFICER BRNC


There’s a new man at the helm at Dartmouth’s Royal Naval College. Captain Roger Readwin took over as Commanding Officer in September but says he’s no stranger to the prestigious institution, attending as a fresh faced cadet in 1991 and then returning as a specialist instructor 10 years later. Now he’s moved his wife, three children and beloved dog, Bertie, into the Captain’s House ready to steer the college through the next two years. Steph Woolvin climbed the hill to say hello...


A


t 6ft 6in, you can certainly spot the new college captain in a crowd. Roger Readwin is well built too, and has made use of his rugby player frame over the years playing for WASPS and the Royal Navy (where he gained six caps). Teamwork is something he believes is vital to the smooth running of the college - which is why one of his first initiatives is the introduction of regular coffee mornings for every department. These take place in the Captain’s House and on the day we meet it’s the turn of the cleaners: “I believe the small details are just as important as the big ones - from the standard of teaching to the quality of polish on the cannons and shining floors - everything has to be the best it can be. Of course it’s an added bonus that I get to drink coffee and eat cake!”


Roger was born in 1972. He went to school at Seaford College, West Sussex, where he beguiled audiences with his angelic voice as a chorister in the chapel choir. After university he attended Dart-


mouth Royal Naval College graduating as a Warfare Officer in 1991 and specialising as a mine clearance diving officer. His first posting was in Portsmouth - detecting, classifying and sending divers down to destroy mines around the UK and abroad. “I chose this field because it allowed me to take on high levels of responsibility as a young officer carry- ing out high intensity operations.” Roger then had a spell back at BRNC as a teach- ing instructor. “I spent my time lecturing and playing rugby with Brix- ham Rugby Club. It was during this time that my wife, Chrissie, gave birth to our first son George at Torbay Hospital. The rugby team came into the hospital en masse to


see him!” Roger became a Principal Warfare Officer in 2004 and spent time on board Type 23 frigates including HMS Mon- mouth. He also served in America taking the position of liaison officer to the US Chief of Navy Operations at the Pentagon. Roger’s seagoing career finished with him taking command of HMS Sutherland op- erating in the Mediterranean and the Gulf.


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