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ment (as does its 2019 successor, Riverside Fashions). In 1909 it has recently been extensively upgraded by the owners, Plymouth Breweries Ltd, to offer “a high-class hotel with spacious bedrooms and sitting rooms, a smoke room and billiard room”. The King’s Arms, like other estab- lishments, has applied for a licence extension for Regatta from 11pm to midnight. Although strongly opposed by Dartmouth’s non-con- formist churches and temperance societies, citing the risk of antisocial behaviour, the magistrates have agreed, the Mayor commenting that the Regatta is “the one great holiday of the year”. Retracing our steps towards


the Quay, we see on our right the distinctive frontage of Cranford & Sons, printers, stationers and booksellers (in 2019, Kendrick’s restaurant). In 1909 the Cranfords, who own the Dartmouth Chronicle, have owned these premises for well over a century. Next door on the right is the ice cream parlour of Guiseppe and Celesta Belli, from Italy; Guiseppe originally came to Dartmouth to fit the marble floor in the Naval College chapel. He’s do- ing good business in the sunshine. Ahead are the arches at the


G t


entrance to the Royal Avenue Gar- dens, illuminated at night by gas lamps of orange, blue, green and white. This year the Regatta Illumi- nations combine gas, electric and candle light. Electricity powers a star on the bandstand and displays on garden features, while seven hundred candles are arranged in chains of “fairy lamps” over the flowerbeds. We head in the direc- tion of the merry-go-round, past a group of smartly dressed ladies enjoying the holiday atmosphere. At no 5 on our left approach- ing the Quay are the “Borough Supply Stores” of Jasper Bartlett & Co, “established 1840 and always


The Quay, looking north


uiseppe originally c o Dartmouth t


olleg e chapel.


marble floor in the Naal C


o fit the v


conducted on principles of strict commercial integrity”. Along with tea, coffee and “finest English Provisions”, Bartlett supplies wines, spirits and his own pale ale, manufactured at Warfleet Brewery. Dartmouth friends tell us in hushed tones that Mr Bartlett’s wife Olive recently died in tragic circum- stances – severely depressed, she took her own life by drinking insecticide. Mrs Bartlett was


ame


well-known – she was active in the District Nursing Association and the Cottage Hospital, and the loss is deeply felt. (In 2019, Boots occupies no 5 and no 6 next door). With almost no vehicles there’s


plenty of room on the Quay, though it’s busy with people, including “bluejackets”, probably from the Royal Naval College – the new building opened only four years ago, in 1905. At no 7 is the office of Edwin Lovell & Sons, auctioneers and valuers (in 2019, Just Fancy). Their advertisement in the newspaper shows several signif- icant properties in Dartmouth and Kingswear, available to buy or rent.


Nos 8 and 9 the Quay are both


owned by the Dawe family. Upstairs at no 9 is the well-known Criterion Restaurant, which Mr C H Dawe has taken over from his father James. The family also makes soda water and other fizzy drinks, including an award-winning dry ginger ale, at their factory in Clarence Street. They’re advertising a new filtration system, enabling them to “easily compete with London firms”. Although tea in the Criterion


With almost no v ther


on the Qua, though it’s busy with people


e’s plenty of r y


is tempting, we are distracted by George Gay’s drapery shop on the ground floor (Henry Lloyd in 2019). They too have a sale, “a bona-fide effort to dispose of surplus season stock and not an attempt to foist off a lot of inferior goods under the pretence of cheapness”. Maybe we can pick up a real bargain. Next door at no 10 is a “furnishing iron- monger, cutler and yacht outfitter”, owned and run by the Tolman family. Next are the


ehicles oom


Quay’s two


longest running establishments, in some of the


oldest surviving properties in the town. At no 12, G B Cundell & Co, a grocery store (Fatface in 2019) has been going for nearly a century, while the Royal Castle Hotel, the major landmark on the Quay, has


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