search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HOW DOES DARTMOUTH BENEFIT FROM THE FOOD FESTIVAL TAKING PLACE? The Festival is widely regarded as being one of the best food festivals in the country and brings 25,000 visitors to the town each October. Of course, with temporary stalls providing extra retail opportunities, not every business enjoys a surge in sales over Festival weekend, but we know that when shops run a ‘Festival theme’ offer or pro- motion, they get people walking through their door. It’s true to say that we’re always listening, so if any businesses want to get in touch to talk through opportunities – we are all ears. We also know that many visitors return to Dart- mouth again and again outside of the Festival and that this brings longer term benefits for the town as a whole.


WHO ELSE BENEFITS FROM THE FESTIVAL? The Festival supports a number of local community


groups and ventures throughout the year. As part of our commitment to inspire the next generation of chefs, the Festival hosts the local heat of the national Rotary Young Chef competition and an annual Children’s Day - coordi- nated by Café Alf Resco - which brings together over 250 local school children to enjoy a free day out, packed with hands on cookery demos and activities. The free Children’s Tea Party which follows is always popular too. We love to encourage start up food-related businesses


and have established an annual Devon Business Start-Up Award. The award invites applications from new food-re- lated businesses based in Devon that use local ingredi- ents, products and/or suppliers. The Award gives winners a substantial helping hand via a prize package which includes a range of marketing support, business guidance and promotional opportunities. This year’s winner is Plant Life (www.theplantlife.org.uk) who will be serving up delicious plant based food with a naughty twist. Local charities may also apply for one of four free chari-


ty pitches available over the Festival weekend. Causes that have benefited in the past include Dartmouth Food Bank, Dartmouth Community Orchard and Friends of Rowcroft. Providing opportunities like these helps keep the


Festival firmly rooted in our community. We are always exploring new partnerships and are currently in discus- sion with local schools and colleges, working with them on new ideas to support the local community and young people in particular.


WHAT CAN WE LOOK FORWARD TO THIS YEAR? So much! Our favourite highlights include the Chefs’


Demo Tent which, as always, will be packed to the rafters with the usual mix of established names and emerging talent in the South West, including Mark Hix, Matt Tebbutt, Romy Gill MBE, Jane Baxter and of course our Festival Advocate, Mitch Tonks. There will be plenty of opportunities to brush up on


your own kitchen skills at one of the many workshops organsed by Pipers Farm (pipersfarm.com) for their debut year. Our ever popular wine seminars will again be coordi-


nated by Sunday Telegraph wine and drinks columnist Susy Atkins with a great line up of drinks experts including Will Lyons (The Sunday Times) and Fiona Beckett (The Guardian). 2019 also sees us welcome our first ‘Artist in Residence’,


Emily Thomas to the festival. She is a young, local talent and we’re delighted she has come on board – you’ll meet her as you make your way around the festival and we’ll be sharing her work online for you all to enjoy. And that’s not all! We are also introducing this year our


Monday Community Lunch – a new initiative to use up any surplus food from the festival and have the local com- munity enjoy it. We are really excited about this one. And lastly, this year Eat Your Words is back with a jam- packed schedule as always! You’ll find inspiring experts, food writers and change making chefs who will open your mind to new ideas, fresh challenges and bust some myths along the way. This year, we’re delighted to welcome back some friends, old and new; including Guy-Singh-Watson, the man behind Riverford, Henry Dimbleby, founder of Leon and a NationalmFood Strategy lead with DEFRA will also join us alongside Chef Tom Hunt and Slow Food Board Director Shane Holland and many more – you won’t want to miss these sessions.


HOW CAN I GET INVOLVED? It takes a core team of twenty and a hundred additional volunteers to make the Dartmouth Food Festival what it is today and we would love you to join us. Whatever your strengths, talents or interests - we think we can put them to good use. You can volunteer for a few hours or the whole three days of the Festival, or help at pre-Festival fundraising events throughout the year. The roles are numerous and fun and range from those that require absolutely no prior experience to those that would suit people with a background in admin, event management, design or sales. All we ask is that you love food and people! If you’d like to learn more email office@ dartmouthfoodfestival.com For more information on becoming a Festival Patron, please email Penny on enquiries@nonsuch-house.co.uk To receive exclusive recipes and stay up to date with all the latest events info, sign up to our Festival newsletter via dartmouthfoodfestival.com and click the “subscribe” button at the top of our page. Images by Andy Carter & Ed Ovendon


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140