search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INTERIORS


63 Future-proofing bathroom design


Robin Tuffley of Closomat explains how whether you are designing a bathroom for a domestic, multi-user or commercial environment, there is one overriding consideration to bear in mind: a proactive approach to suitability for all


I


t doesn’t matter what words are used – inclusive, accessible, multi-generational, multi-occupancy – they all mean the


same thing. Today’s bathrooms (washrooms, restrooms, cloakrooms, public conveniences and ensuites) need to accommodate a huge range of needs.


Those needs are physical, mental, racial, religious. It is no secret we are facing an ageing population, with all its degenerative health issues, or that our population is becoming increasingly obese, and 20 per cent of the population is registered disabled. Islam is now the largest non-Christian religion in the UK, is set to triple in the next 30 years to 13 million, and has specific toilet requirements.


HM Government is currently debating a Private Members Bill, which, if enacted, will require all new public buildings to include a Changing Places assisted accessible toilet. The ‘Neighbourhoods of the future’ White Paper published by the Agile Ageing Alliance calls for housing to feature built-in adaptability. A YouGov poll highlighted that 75 per cent of people feel new homes should be built to be accessible from the outset, with 90 per cent of those respondents citing an accessible WC and shower as the most important accessibility features. Market research has further identified that the market for inclusive bathrooms has grown by 20 per cent in less than five years, and is now worth £180m. Factor in too changes to accessible best practice guidelines – BS8300 and Lifetime Homes. The British Standard was revised in 2018, and now applies to all multi-occupancy buildings, whether new build projects or not. It now recommends up to 5 per cent of bedrooms should have a wheelchair accessible ensuite shower room, if ensuite facilities are available elsewhere in the building; a further 1 per cent should have a fixed track hoist system, a further 5 per cent (maximum) should have an ensuite for ambulant disabled people,


with an overall total of 15 per cent of bedrooms large enough to enable easy adaptation if required in the future. In buildings to which the public have access, or spend any amount of time in, at very least a unisex wheelchair-accessible toilet should be provided.


Lifetime Homes criteria advise an accessible bathroom in every dwelling, on the same storey as the main bedroom, plus an accessible WC at entry level, plus potential for retro-fitting of a hoist. Alongside that, RIBA’s latest guidance for age-friendly housing says “hospital-style bathrooms have made bathing [personal hygiene] a procedure rather than a pleasure for older and disabled people, but safety and practicality no longer need to come at the expense of style.” Therefore, market forces alone are encouraging inclusive design in bathrooms. With developments in mobility equipment technology and design, it is easier than ever


ADF MAY 2019


Just by implementing these few elements, bathrooms and washrooms become accessible and future- proofed, addressing the needs of almost every potential user


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76