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12 NEWS


rented apartments, 23 intermediate apartments and 19 open marketapartments. It will also feature a retail element with three retail units fronting onto York Way. The approval of Building W3 and the Habitat Zone sees the final part of the plot approved, and will deliver a new 1,500 m2


building over three storeys.


Designed to high environmental standards, it will feature solar panels, a green roof, and be built of sustainable materials including a cross laminated timber (CLT) structure. By using responsibly sourced timber in both the structure and cladding, the design enhances the promotion of ell-being that is at the heart of the development, as well as creating a tactile and sustainable building. The facade design seeks to “elegantly interact with its immediate surroundings, creating spaces that encourage social interactions across different areas in the building,” said the architects. Smith, project director at KCCLP


commented: “We are thrilled that the entirety of W Zone now has the go-ahead and we are excited for works to start on the site next year. More than 10 years on from the start of construction works, we


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are proud to have finalised the detailed design of one of the final pieces of the King’s Cross puzzle.” David Morley, founder of David Morley


Architects commented, “This is the only site at King’s Cross straddling the boundary between Camden and Islington and we are delighted that our masterplan for bringing together a new mixed-use community, focused around a garden, will soon be realised. As well as connecting east to west, the project will transform the streetscape of York Way and create a new gateway to King’s Cross for people arriving from the north.” George Wilson, associate at Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, commented, “King’s Cross’ W Zone presents a fantastic opportunity to establish a new residential community centred around high quality public space, communal amenities and community facilities, creating a unique place to live within central London. We are delighted that W Zone has been fully approved and can now be realised.” Timo Haedrich RIBA, director at


Haptic Architects commented, “We are very proud that this exciting project has been given the go ahead. The building


will provide a meaningful community centre, a place for people to learn, exercise and socialise. ”


“The openness and transparency of the ground floor; its concertina-ing wall, movable screens and integrated seats create a seamless flow between the building and the adjacent public realm. The focus is to achieve the highest degree of sustainability. Timber is used in both the structure and facade, a material which has intrinsic tactile and pleasant qualities, making it fitting for a community hub.”


Jan Kattein from Jan Kattein Architects commented, “Proposals for the Habitat Zone were conceived in close collaboration with educational charity Global Generation who operates a number of public gardens across London. The buildings are designed to minimize the threshold between ecology and interior. Urban ecologies are some of the most interesting habitats on our planet and it is fantastic news that our project will be able to bring a little piece of wilderness to people’s doorstep.” The W Zone is set to complete in 2022,


and operators for the Habitat Zone and leisure facilities will be announced “in due course,” said KCCLP.


ADF MAY 2019


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