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PROJECT REPORT: COMMERCIAL & WORKPLACE ENVIRONMENTS


architects designed a simple cuboidal form, three storeys high, devoid of any complex extrusions or elevations. “It does that to reduce the energy demand,” says Hayes. “It wraps around a central atrium, and there’s a really good amount of daylight provided through glazing. But to balance the difference between solar gain and daylight, there are external timber fins, detailed with Siberian larch.” The fins, which extrude slightly higher than roof level, instil a strong vertical aesthetic to the scheme. The fins step in and out in relation to the main body of the building, varying the intensity of shading at different points according to the scheme’s internal profile. The timber detailing is contrasted against crisp aluminium cladding and considerable use of glazing, which simultaneously differentiate the scheme from surrounding residential and civic buildings and “reflect the use of the building – a collaborative high-tech startup environment.” Structurally, the building has a hybrid concrete frame with timber infill. In terms of scale, Architype’s updated design reduces the overall elevation of the business centre from the original design, configuring it in relation to the massing of adjacent buildings. The main entrance to the building is located at the western elevation, opening immediately into the triple-height atrium and top-lit central ‘hubspace,’ and a reprographic area to the right. The north and south elevations are flanked by the centre’s office and consultation spaces of varying sizes – catering for from four to twenty-one users. At the back of the hubspace, to the far east side of the building, are WCs, as well as a lift and staircase which provide access to the first and second floors. On these upper floors, circulation spaces fringe the central atrium’s southern side, also leading to balcony areas above the main entrance at the building’s western elevation. The plant, IT server and main kitchen areas are located on the ground floor in the north east corner in order to create an easily accessible plant area and M&E services at a point in the building that offers residential amenity, while smaller kitchenettes and tea areas serve the first and second floors. “It’s all part of the ‘Tetris’ game of making the building work,” says Hayes.


Above all, a workspace


“We knew it was going to be a community workplace, that was always going to stay the same,” says Hayes. The team envisioned an environment that would constantly


ADF MAY 2019


27


© Kier Construction


be evolving and revolving – a business incubator. In line with this, Hayes continues: “We wanted to create a central area in the building that all the offices are accessed by to encourage collaboration, and increase happenstance interaction and the cross-fertilisation of ideas.” At the very heart of the building, the central hubspace is top-lit and spacious – “somewhere to breakout to”, says Hayes. Considerable attention was paid to the common circulation areas of the building; by creating one primary circulation route


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