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97 POSTCARD BY GINNY WARE


Cyclone Zorba, Adamas, Milos. T


AFTER LIVING ABOARD ON THE RIVER DART FOR EIGHT YEARS, GINNY WARE AND HER HUSBAND CARL SET SAIL IN 2013 FOR FRANCE AND BEYOND. HERE IS THE LATEST FROM THEM AS THEY CONTINUE TO EXPLORE THE MEDITERRANEAN ON THEIR 65 YEAR OLD 35FT YACHT.


HE fiercest storm Greece had seen in decades was heading straight for Leonie. A cyclone had formed in the southern Ionian Sea between Sicily and


Greece and forecasters said tomorrow it would hit the island of Milos, where we were moored. The predicted meltemi, from which we had taken


shelter on the quay at Adamas, had turned into a fully blown cyclone armed with Force 10 winds to whip up the sea into a foaming mass of huge waves. According to local fishermen the last time the Cyclades had experienced such a destructive wind was 75 years ago. Expecting the worst, schools across the Cyclades and mainland southern Greece announced closure for the duration and all ferries stopped running. What to do – should we stay or should we go? There


was no way we could outrun the violent gale, dubbed Cyclone Zorba, and as its course wasn’t wholly predictable going out to sea now would be the craziest decision we had ever made (and we’ve made a few). Not wanting to be smashed into the pontoon,


obviously, the yachts on the outer quay all left to anchor on the opposite side of the bay. Leonie was on the inner harbour and, in theory, would be blown off the pontoon. Advice from the harbour officer and the coastguard, whose boat was also moored on the inside, was to stay on


the pontoon and with our yacht. Leonie was firmly held off the quay thanks to two lazy lines lashed to concrete blocks on the sea bed so we decided to risk remaining. We would batten down the hatches and sit tight until it was all over. Having made this decision it was then unnerving


to watch half the local fishing fleet head out for the anchorages. The local skipper next to Leonie, who only the previous day had attached a remarkable four lazy lines to his yacht in readiness for the approaching storm, hastily released them to join the departing flotilla; while the worried German couple on our port-side scrambled across their gangplank with an overnight bag, eager to see out the storm in a weather-proof hotel room. They hustled down the quay with the parting words ‘call us if there is a problem with our boat’. Other boats were on the pontoon but they were empty.


It slowly dawned on us we were the only two people here. The storm was due to peak at 9pm and as the wind strengthened thoughts of a hotel room were tempting, but we had already overspent our shoestring budget so a quiet cosy night on shore was out of the question. We packed a grab-bag each though just in case it became too dangerous to stay on board. As the afternoon wore on the gale grew ever more


Adamas and Milos Bay, Milos.


from Leonie


Leonie found a secluded anchorage at Kolokitha Island, Crete.


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