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91 Garden design by Colette Charsley How Green is Your Garden? G


reen is interesting, it is no longer just a colour but is the symbol of ecology


and, well, all things green, and is now also a verb. As humans we can detect


more shades of green than any other colour and these range from yellow greens, such as lime to blue greens like turquoise. In gardening terminology blue greens are often called glaucous. On the colour wheel, green


sits between yellow and blue and this is how it is made and these are the two colours that it goes particularly well with. It is not one of the primary colours (red, yellow and blue) but is a secondary colour, together with purple and orange. It is considered to be a cool colour. The opposite or complementary colour to green is red. If these two are seen together they each make the other sing out. Green, almost universally, signi-


fies growth, re-birth and fertility. In Muslim countries it is a holy colour whilst to the Irish it is considered lucky. It is obviously strongly associated with gardens and nature. The Romans believed that green was restful to the eyes because of its prevalence in nature. There are scientific and evolutionary reasons as to why we are drawn to green so they were right. It restores the senses.


Green is the predominant colour in almost every garden, yet it is usually overlooked and taken for granted. It provides the structure, bones, shape and volume of many gardens. Green forms the backdrop to all other colours in the garden. There are no colours that a shade of green does not go with. Bright lime greens such as those


found in alchemilla mollis or some of the heucheras can be used to brighten up dull corners. Bright greens are en- ergising and will foreshorten a view so you could use them if you wanted to


alter the perceived size or shape of a garden. On the other hand the darker greens such as holly or yew can be used as sophisticated and restrained structure. They are calming and tend to make areas look larger. You can also play perspective tricks with leaf size. If you use larger ones at the front and small ones towards the back of a border you can create the illusion of depth. Flowers are ephemeral, but the


colour green is one of the most basic elements of garden design.


colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com t: 01548 581753 m: 07774 827799 Follow me on Twitter @ColetteCharsley • Instagram colettecharsley Professional Landscape & Garden Design


Creative and beautiful designs for village, town and country gardens


Colette Charsley PG Dip OCGD t: 01548 581753 m: 07774 827799


colette@charsleydesign.com www.charsleydesign.com


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